Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Demand grows for Airways Study Abroad programme

Demand grows for Airways Study Abroad programme

Twelve students from two civil aviation universities in China have travelled to New Zealand to begin their studies in the sought-after Airways Air Traffic Control “Study Abroad” programme.

The Civil Aviation University of China (CAUC) and the Civil Aviation Flight University of China (CAFUC) have sent students to attend the Airways New Zealand programme which started on 10 February.

The Airways Study Abroad programme has grown in popularity since the first intake of CAUC students two years ago, with registrations of interest from ATC training universities around the world.

Sharon Cooke, Airways’ Head of Training, says the programme has been cleverly designed to meet the needs of students from both the Northern and Southern hemispheres.

“We’ve designed the scheduling to ensure the programme matches students’ own semesters, and students have the option to attend classes at nearby Massey University to make up the credits they require in subjects other than ATC at the same time,” she explains.

“Our low teacher to student ratios and excellent standard of training makes the Study Abroad programme a highly desirable option for international students,” says Ms Cooke.

The intensive ATC basic training provided in the Study Abroad programme is usually undertaken by students in the third year of their Air Traffic Management degree, although the programme is adapted to meet the needs of different groups. The students are supported by Airways as they experience living and studying in New Zealand.

“We’ve seen demand for the programme amplify following the successes of the first group of CAUC students,” says Ms Cooke. “Students graduating with Airways experience benefit from quality training and significant improvement in their IELTS scores, which substantially aids their employment and remuneration prospects,” she adds.

The 24-week programme provides students with the opportunity to use Airways’ state-of-the-art training technologies including the 4D Total Control simulator.

Ends --

© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


DIY: Kiwi Ingenuity And Masking Tape Saves Chick

Kiwi ingenuity and masking tape has saved a Kiwi chick after its egg was badly damaged endangering the chick's life. The egg was delivered to Kiwi Encounter at Rainbow Springs in Rotorua 14 days ago by a DOC worker with a large hole in its shell and against all odds has just successfully hatched. More>>


Trade: Key To Lead Mission To India; ASEAN FTA Review Announced

Prime Minister John Key will lead a trade delegation to India next week, saying the pursuit of a free trade agreement with the protectionist giant is "the primary reason we're going" but playing down the likelihood of early progress. More>>



MYOB: Digital Signatures Go Live

From today, Inland Revenue will begin accepting “digital signatures”, saving businesses and their accountants a huge amount of administration time and further reducing the need for pen and paper in the workplace. More>>

Oil Searches: Norway's Statoil Quits Reinga Basin

Statoil, the Norwegian state-owned oil company, has given up oil and gas exploration in Northland's Reinga Basin, saying the probably of a find was 'too low'. More>>


Modern Living: Auckland Development Blowouts Reminiscent Of Run Up To GFC

The collapse of property developments in Auckland is "almost groundhog day" to the run-up of the global financial crisis in 2007/2008 as banks refuse to fund projects due to blowouts in construction and labour costs, says John Kensington, the author of KPMG's Financial Institutions Performance Survey. More>>


Health: New Zealand's First ‘No Sugary Drinks’ Logo Unveiled

New Zealand’s first “no sugary drinks logo” has been unveiled at an event in Wellington... It will empower communities around New Zealand to lift their health and wellbeing and send a clear message about the damage caused by too much sugar in our diets. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news