Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Telecom changing its name to Spark

Telecom changing its name to Spark

Rebrand is latest in series of changes that are resetting the company for the digital future

Telecom intends to change its name later this year to Spark, marking the next step in a series of far-reaching changes the company has made during the past year.

Telecom Chief Executive Simon Moutter said Spark better reflects the company’s new direction and the aspirations it has for its place in the life of New Zealanders.
“As a company we’ve moved far beyond the home telephone. Spark better represents what we are today – it is all about digital services, fibre, mobile, data, cloud, entertainment, apps, or whatever new technology is around the corner.  

“Spark is a word that has life and energy, and links to the creativity of New Zealanders, the modern tech economy and our desire to enable our customers to thrive. It will carry with it our widely recognised logo, which is generally referred to as the ‘spark’.”

The change was announced as part of Telecom’s half-year results, which showed the company gaining 200,000 mobile customers in the past 12 months and announcing a new cutting edge internet-delivered TV and movie service called ShowmeTV.

“The upcoming launch of ShowmeTV offers all New Zealanders an exciting new choice about how to get their home entertainment, which we think represents the future of how people will access content. It’s a great example of how this company is changing by delivering the sorts of new services our customers want,” said Mr Moutter.

Last year, Telecom undertook a number of bold steps, including:
•          launching its 4G mobile data network, available to its customers at no extra charge – and underpinned by a brand-new core data network using state-of-the-art optical transport technology;
•          revamping phone booths into a nationwide network of public WiFi hotspots to give customers even better connections when out and about, and enhance the value of mobility solutions for business clients;
•          launching new generation Ultra Fibre services on the government-supported Ultra-Fast Broadband (UFB) network, and faster VDSL broadband over the existing copper network for customers not connected to UFB;
•          through its Gen-i unit, becoming a leader in Cloud services for business and government customers, purchasing IT infrastructure and data centre specialist Revera and building new data centres in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch and Dunedin;
•          winning the contract to build a 21st century online educational platform for New Zealand schools to maximise the digital opportunities created by the UFB rollout under the Government’s Network for Learning initiative;
•          using digital technology to encourage Kiwi generosity and revolutionise the giving sector –creating New Zealand’s first zero-fees online fundraising platform for charities and worthy causes through the Telecom Foundation’s purchase of fast-growing local startup Givealittle;
•          committing a further $149 million to become the biggest player in the newly available 700 MHz band radio spectrum, enhancing the efficient rollout of 4G mobile data services to rural New Zealand.
•          exiting the Australian market to focus on building a better technology future for New Zealand.

“We’re operating at a faster pace than in the past and we have to appeal to a broader range of customers in a competitive market place. Our successful initiatives in 4G mobile, fibre, WiFi, cloud services and applications have given us new momentum,” said Mr Moutter.

“When we embarked on this journey, we knew that at some point we would likely move beyond the Telecom name – to something that better reflects what our customers expect from us. Last year we gave our mass-market brand a colour and style refresh to reflect the changes we had already made as a business – and customers have responded positively.

“We’ve now decided to take the next step. We believe Spark symbolises what we are now - a confident, forward-looking technology company that helps people to connect, engage and share their lives in amazing ways, and helps businesses to compete and prosper in the digital age.

“Spark will be the new face of our company, focused on ensuring that everyone can live, work and play in more amazing ways. In the city, at the beach, at home, on the farm. From Otara to Otorohanga, from Omaha to Oamaru.”

Spark Digital Solutions will be the new name for Gen-i, providing solutions for the rapidly evolving needs of business, enterprise and government clients as they meet the demands of an increasingly globalised, connected and mobile customer base. 

Spark Ventures will be the new name for Telecom Digital Ventures and will be focused on accelerating the company’s future focus, delivering connected digital experiences that customers love and applications such as Smart Data analytics that will power tomorrow’s successful businesses.

Spark New Zealand Limited is intended to be the new name for the parent company, Telecom Corporation of New Zealand Limited.
Until the name change takes place later this year, the company will continue to trade as Telecom and Gen-i. 
“Technology-enabled digital services are changing the world. We will have succeeded when Spark is seen as an indispensable part of people’s everyday life and we are helping to unleash New Zealand’s potential,” said Mr Moutter.

For more information visit www.telecom.co.nz/sparkshould

Telecom_Timeline_HR_Landscape.pdf

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Must Sell 20 Petrol Stations: Z Cleared To Buy Caltex Assets

Z Energy is allowed to buy the Caltex and Challenge! petrol station chains but must sell 19 of its retail sites and one truck-stop, the Commerce Commission has ruled in a split decision that acknowledges possible retail price coordination between fuel retailers occurs in some regions. More>>

ALSO:

Huntly: Genesis Extends Life Of Coal-Fuelled Power Station To 2022

Genesis Energy will keep its two coal and gas-fired units at Huntly Power Station operating until 2022, having previously said they'd be closed by 2018, after wringing a high price from other electricity generators who wanted to keep them as back-up. More>>

ALSO:

Dammed If You Do: Ruataniwha Irrigation Scheme Hits Farmer Uptake Targets

Enough Hawke's Bay farmers have signed up for water from the proposed Ruataniwha Water Storage Scheme for it to go ahead as long as a cornerstone institutional capital investor can be found to back it, its regional council promoter announced. More>>

ALSO:

Reserve Bank: OCR Stays At 2.25%

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler kept the official cash rate at 2.25 percent, in a decision traders had said could go either way, while predicting inflation will pick up as the slump in oil prices washes out of the data and capacity pressures start to build in the economy. More>>

ALSO:

Export Values Down: NZ Posts Biggest Annual Trade Deficit In 7 Years

New Zealand has recorded its biggest annual trade deficit since April 2009, reflecting weaker prices of agricultural commodities such as dairy products, beef and lamb, and increased imports of vehicles and machinery. More>>

ALSO:

Currency Events: NZ's New $5 Note Wins International Banknote Award

New Zealand’s new Brighter Money $5 note has been named Banknote of the Year in a prestigious international competition. The $5 note was awarded the IBNS Banknote of the Year title at the International Bank Note Society’s annual meeting. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news