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Kiwi women’s hairdressing trends drive thriving industry

February 23, 2014

Kiwi women’s hairdressing trends drive thriving industry

The scale and economic power of New Zealand’s hairdressing community has been revealed for the first time in the inaugural L’Oréal Hairdressing Industry Report.

The report shows Kiwi women are spending more on their hair per visit than before the GFC and the number of young people entering the industry is growing.

The report is the result of months of industry research and surveying and shows 8,000 hairdressers and 1,200 apprentices are employed in New Zealand.

Together they create an annual turnover of $0.6 billion - more than each of retail giants The Briscoes Group (Briscoes, Rebel Sport and Living and Giving) and Hallensteins Glassons.

The large consumer market turnover is the result of an increasing spend per visit by Kiwi women. The report reveals an average spend of $161 for a cut, colour and blow dry – with an average visit rate of every nine weeks for a haircut and every four months for a colour.

L’Oréal New Zealand Professional Products Division General Manager Gary Marshall says the industry is in good health, despite the economic recession of the past few years.

“The number of visits per woman has reduced slightly over that time but the overall industry revenue is stable because of increased spend,” he says. “Almost 30 per cent of New Zealand women now rank hair as their top day-to-day beauty priority. It’s a necessity, not just a luxury.”

The health of the industry is reflected in the growing number of young people training to become hairdressers – 17 per cent more qualified in 2012 than the year before. Of the 1,200 apprentices in 2012, 80 per cent were under the age of 25 and many were direct school-leavers.

“It’s a career that offers travel, the ability to start your own business and lifelong learning,” says Marshall. “But it’s also fiercely competitive due to low-entry costs and the rivalry in securing and retaining customers.”

The industry is dominated by independent owners who have weathered the economic storm by driving customer loyalty and adapting to meet increased demands from clients.

The L’Oréal report shows time-pressured New Zealanders are increasingly looking for express products and greater levels of customer service as salons move toward more spa-like environments.

It has long been known that women reveal much to their hairdressers, but the depth of that client relationship may have been underestimated.

The report’s customer insights reveal women want to “fall in love” with their hairdresser and feel guilty when they “cheat” on a regular stylist.

Profiled within the report are many of the country’s top stylists who say exceptional service is as important as a great result to ensure customer loyalty.

The inaugural L’Oréal Hairdressing Industry Report coincides with an exciting time for the industry as stylists throughout the country prepare for the 20th L’Oréal Colour Trophy Awards, the industry’s premiere event.

The awards attract more than 300 entrants seeking recognition in a number of categories including NZ Hairdresser of the Year, Men’s Image, Young Colourist and Salon of the Year.

Twenty finalists compete for the awards at Auckland’s Vector Arena on Saturday February 22.

About L’Oréal New Zealand
L’Oréal is the world’s leading cosmetic, skin care and hair care company. In New Zealand, it employs 192 staff including nationwide area managers and educators who work to create a strong brand presence for L’Oréal products and services.

About the L’Oréal Colour Trophy Awards
The L’Oréal Colour Trophy is the most prestigious hair event in the industry and is held every two years. Hair stylists submit a photographic entry into an award category. The finalists are brought together in Auckland to recreate their photographic entry for live judging by a panel of three judges to determine the winner in each category. The event attracts more than 300 entrants from across NZ in search of NZ Hairdresser of the Year, Men’s Image, Young Colourist and Salon of the Year awards. MC Dai Henwood introduces fashion shows by WORLD, Trelise Cooper, COOP and Huffer which are presented together with the above awards as well as the two special awards. This year’s is the 20th presentation of the L’Oréal Colour Trophy.

ENDS

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