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Vehicle importers group welcomes new mandatory safety tech

Vehicle importers group welcomes new mandatory safety technology

The peak body for New Zealand’s used import industry – responsible for half of the vehicles currently entering the New Zealand fleet – has welcomed draft plans to make Electronic Stability Control mandatory for both new and used cars entering the country.

The technology improves vehicle safety by helping to identify a loss of traction, and assisting in regaining control.

A draft plan released by associate transport minister Michael Woodhouse today provides a phased schedule for the introduction:

• All new light passenger and goods vehicles from July 1, 2015

• Used class MC vehicles (four-wheel-drive SUVs and off-road vehicles) from January 1, 2016

• Used class MA vehicles (passenger cars) with engine capacity greater then 2-litres from January 1, 2018

• All other used light passenger and goods vehicles from January 1, 2020

Imported Motor Vehicle Industry Association chief executive David Vinsen welcomes the move.

“Firstly, we believe that proposal is workable for the whole industry – and that that this announcement gives certainty to the trade,” says Vinsen.

“The IMVIA is pleased that the government’s proposal will see the introduction of safer vehicles to our fleet as quickly as practicable.

“The import industry is the leading supplier of vehicles to New Zealand families, and the proposed structure makes this technology available in good time, and in an affordable way.”

"We would like to have seen the implementation dates further out, but we believe that the proposed schedule of start dates is workable for the used vehicle industry, particularly as we have been given notice in good time,” Vinsen adds.

The IMVIA has been involved for some time in the process of researching the supply of vehicles and the best implementation schedule for the new technology.

“We have appreciated having the opportunity to work with the Minister and his officials on researching and developing the initiative, and we will make a formal submission during the consultation period,” says Vinsen.

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