Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


More than 5300 farmers to benefit from TB changes

27 February 2014

More than 5300 farmers to benefit from TB changes

From 1 March 2014, more than 5300 herdowners across some 1.7 million hectares will benefit from reductions in both Movement Control Areas (MCA) and cattle and deer bovine tuberculosis (TB) tests.

Herds throughout parts of the Central North Island, Southern North Island and Northern South Island will no longer require pre-movement TB testing, but will continue to be tested annually.

Farmer and Wellington TBfree Committee Chairman Peter Gaskin no longer has to pre-movement test his cattle. He said the progress made by the TB control programme through movement restrictions and wild animal control has been particularly satisfying.

“It’s been very pleasing for farmers to be able to enjoy another on-farm benefit, resulting from the sustained pressure applied by TBfree New Zealand, as it implements the national TB control plan,” said Peter.

TBfree New Zealand acknowledged farmers for their co-operation and contribution towards the main objective of eradicating TB from at least 2.5 million hectares by 2026. The disease has been eradicated from 500,000 hectares since 2011.

As TBfree New Zealand makes progress towards this goal, farmers will benefit from reductions in TB testing requirements and the relaxation of movement restrictions. However, bovine TB is still a threat and farmers need to fulfil their obligations in helping to manage the disease.

Dairy farmers, such as Michael Sargent, of Tihoi, have significantly invested in the success of TBfree New Zealand through their DairyNZ levy. DairyNZ is the largest industry funder of the TB control programme.

Michael learnt first-hand from his father when he took over the day-to-day running of the farm that TB is still out there and farmers need to keep testing their stock and make wise purchasing decisions.

Being in a MCA until now has meant Michael’s been required to TB test all cattle leaving the property at least 60 days before they shift. Although he admits it has been an inconvenience, he is also aware that the testing is an important aspect of TB control.

“It feels great to not have to pre-movement test stock anymore, as it means a lot less work and it will allow us greater flexibility when selling stock,” said Michael.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news