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Solid Energy appoints new Chief Executive Officer

Solid Energy appoints new Chief Executive Officer

Solid Energy has appointed Australian mining executive, Dan Clifford, as Chief Executive Officer. Mr Clifford, who currently works for Glencore as General Manager of the Ulan Complex which incorporates an opencast and two underground mines in New South Wales, takes up the position in early May.

Mr Clifford began working in the mining industry more than 20 years ago in Australia and his career has taken him to coal mines across Queensland, New South Wales and South Africa. He has worked for Anglo Coal and BHP Billiton in technical, operations and regional management roles.

Mr Clifford has a degree in Mining Engineering, a First Class Certificate of Competency for underground coal mines, is a Member of the Australian Institute of Company Directors and has served in various directorship roles within Glencore’s assets.

Solid Energy Acting Chair, Pip Dunphy, said that the Board was very pleased to have secured the appointment of an industry executive with extensive opencast and underground experience, to lead the company. “Dan has successfully restructured mining operations to be more efficient and economic and leaves behind, at Ulan, a significantly improved health and safety performance across that operation which produces 11 million tonnes of coal a year, with a workforce of about 900 people.”

Ms Dunphy said that the Solid Energy Board acknowledged the leadership and commitment of Garry Diack who has been Interim Chief Executive since February 2013.

“Garry has led the company through a very difficult period of change over the last year. He has worked effectively with Board and his management team in refocusing the business on its core coal mining and marketing capabilities and restructuring the company to give it the best possible chance of returning to profitability. Under Garry’s leadership, the company has made very good progress in responding to the fall in international coal prices, reducing costs and focusing on cash generation,” Ms Dunphy said.


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