Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Te Arai development helping endangered birds

MEDIA RELEASE 13 March 2014

Te Arai development helping endangered birds

A development at Te Arai, which opponents claim is threatening endangered shorebird species, is having a beneficial impact on breeding and nesting, says the hapu behind the project.

Te Uri o Hau chief executive Deborah Harding said census data collected over the breeding season at the adjacent Mangawhai Wildlife Refuge–an important nesting site of the fairy tern, New Zealand’s most endangered bird - shows that the current season has been the most successful since data began being collected in the early 1990s.

The season saw nine fairy tern chicks hatch and all survive to fledge, a record number. In addition, a record nine shorebirds species were observed nesting in the refuge.


PairsChicks bandedChicks fledgedMWR Productivity (chicks fledged per pair)

The results were welcomed by Forest & Bird.

“Forest & Bird strongly supports Te Uri o Hau’s involvement in the fairy tern recovery programme, and their trapping work at Mangawhai and Te Arai over the last winter has significantly lowered predator numbers at Mangawhai. Fairy tern recovery will only succeed if we all work together for to protect this unique taonga,” said Mark Bellingham, Forest & Bird’s Fairy Tern Project Manager.

Deborah Harding said Forest & Bird, DoC and volunteers from the Ornithological Society, Dotterel Care Group, About Tern and the New Zealand Fairy Tern Charitable Trust, all play a vital role in protecting the shorebird populations, and have done so for many years. The good weather is also important.

“But the single major difference between this breeding season and past years have been the changes which have occurred at Te Arai over the past 18 months – where a 616 hectare pine forest is being transformed into a world class golf course, Tara-Iti, and small scale development.

“The removal of 150 hectares of pine trees has significantly reduced the cover for pests and predators – like stoats, rats, hedgehogs and cats – which threaten the shorebirds in the immediately adjacent Mangawhai Wildlife Refuge.

“The development has significantly increased the resources available for predator control. Last year, $70,000 was spent to markedly increase the intensity of hunting, trapping, and poisoning operations, working with DoC and other volunteer groups, including the Mangawhai Harbour Restoration Society.

“This includes a site-wide animal pest control programme throughout the forest. The development also funded predator control at the Mangawhai Wildlife Refuge, and TUOH also obtained funding from the ASB Community Trust for predator control activities over the winter months.

“We have targeted cats, stoats and weasels, rats, harriers, and removed 29 pigs. The success of these programmes can be seen in the reducing number of pests and predators being found and killed, and the much improved breeding and nesting data.

“What we are doing at Te Arai is changing the land use from one with very poor ecological values - a low grade pine forest – to one which is much better for the environment - very limited development with considerable native revegetation and the management of ecological threats. The results show that the development is having a positive effect. With the continued resources we will invest in predator control and revegetation throughout the forest, we expect that these positive impacts will continue to benefit the threatened bird species.”

© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Trade: NZ Trade Deficit Widens To A Record In September

Oct. 27 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's monthly trade deficit widened to a record in September as meat exports dropped to their lowest level in more than three years. More>>


Animal Welfare: Cruel Practices Condemned By DairyNZ Chief

DairyNZ chief executive Tim Mackle says cruel and illegal practices are not in any way condoned or accepted by the industry as part of dairy farming.

Tim says the video released today by Farmwatch shows some footage of transport companies and their workers, as well as some unacceptable behaviour by farmers of dragging calves. More>>


Postnatal Depression: 'The Thief That Steals Motherhood' - Alison McCulloch

Post-natal depression is a sly and cruel illness, described by one expert as ‘the thief that steals motherhood’, it creeps up on its victims, hiding behind the stress and exhaustion of being a new parent, catching many women unaware and unprepared. More>>


DIY: Kiwi Ingenuity And Masking Tape Saves Chick

Kiwi ingenuity and masking tape has saved a Kiwi chick after its egg was badly damaged endangering the chick's life. The egg was delivered to Kiwi Encounter at Rainbow Springs in Rotorua 14 days ago by a DOC worker with a large hole in its shell and against all odds has just successfully hatched. More>>


International Trade: Key To Lead Mission To India; ASEAN FTA Review Announced

Prime Minister John Key will lead a trade delegation to India next week, saying the pursuit of a free trade agreement with the protectionist giant is "the primary reason we're going" but playing down the likelihood of early progress. More>>



MYOB: Digital Signatures Go Live

From today, Inland Revenue will begin accepting “digital signatures”, saving businesses and their accountants a huge amount of administration time and further reducing the need for pen and paper in the workplace. More>>

Oil Searches: Norway's Statoil Quits Reinga Basin

Statoil, the Norwegian state-owned oil company, has given up oil and gas exploration in Northland's Reinga Basin, saying the probably of a find was 'too low'. More>>


Modern Living: Auckland Development Blowouts Reminiscent Of Run Up To GFC

The collapse of property developments in Auckland is "almost groundhog day" to the run-up of the global financial crisis in 2007/2008 as banks refuse to fund projects due to blowouts in construction and labour costs, says John Kensington, the author of KPMG's Financial Institutions Performance Survey. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news