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Baby Safety At Risk from Fake Carriers

17 March 2014

Baby Safety At Risk from Fake Carriers

Counterfeit Trade-In Scheme Offers Parents Hope

Consumers are being warned about the dangers of purchasing fake baby carriers after an increase in New Zealanders being fooled by overseas websites selling counterfeit versions of the popular Ergobaby brand.

Heidi Riley and Louisa Currie from online baby shop, Belly Beyond, are spearheading the fight against the fake websites and have created a world-first Counterfeit Trade-In Offer which runs until the end of March. The duo aim to raise awareness and also provide parents with somewhere to turn if they think they might have bought a fake carrier.

“Parents believe they are buying the real thing because the scam sites are so convincing, and either the carrier never arrives or if it does then it’s unsafe and poses a real danger to their babies” says Currie. “Horror stories from parents who’ve inadvertently purchased a counterfeit carrier only to have a buckle snap on the first wear are becoming all too common” adds Riley.

Currie’s appearance on TV show “Fair Go” (TVNZ, 5 March 2014) highlighted the safety issues - unlike genuine Ergobaby products, the counterfeits have poor quality hardware and lack the rigorous standards and safety testing.

“Until now if you bought a fake carrier you were stuck with it but the Counterfeit Trade-In Offer changes that and gives parents another option” Riley says. Currie adds “when it comes to the safety of your baby, a fake carrier is just not worth the risk”.

The best way to avoid counterfeit Ergobaby carriers is to purchase only from an authorised stockist. People concerned that they’ve bought a fake can complete a simple form online at www.bellybeyond.co.nz.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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