Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Wet weather doesn’t stop rural youth

Wet weather doesn’t stop rural youth

The AgriKidsNZ and TeenAg Regional Finals made their latest stop at the Kaikohe Showgrounds Saturday 15 March.

“The wet weather didn’t hold back our Northern Regional competitors with a record combined number of teams for AgriKidsNZ and TeenAg events,” commented Josie Hampton, AgriKidsNZ & TeenAg Project Leader.

“All teams showed us huge amounts of determination and skill throughout the day,” said Miss Hampton.

Kamo North Cattle, Grace Moscrip, Brodin Haami & Jamie Lindsay from Kamo Intermediate School took home the top honour in the AgriKidsNZ competition and Wild Ones, Paige Jones & Aimie Lawson from Kerikeri High School were the top team in the TeenAg event.

The competitions test skills, strength and stamina while introducing youth to the fun side of agriculture. Primary and high school students from all walks of life are welcome to join in.

Team Okaihau College 1, Claire Graham, Georgina Graham & Cole Tilly from Okaihau College placed second in the AgriKidsNZ competition and third place went to Huanui 3,Jayden Gardner, Shanae Gardner & Elise Moffat from Huanui College.

AgriKidsNZ is open to children 8-13 years of age and they compete in teams of three while the TeenAg competition calls for high school students 13-18 years old, competing in pairs.

This round of competitions saw intense rivalry amongst the TeenAg competitors with team N/C, Harding Leef & Hoeta Maxwell from Northland College taking home second place and Huanui College, Louie Poot & Cam Blackley in third.

The competitions are structured into seven modules which can test anything and everything farm related. The top scoring seven teams continue through to the Race-Off challenge where contestants must work as a team and complete a series of tasks as fast as possible.

Top three teams from each Regional Final are invited to attend the 2014 Grand Final held in Christchurch, 3-5 July where they will battle it out for the national champion’s title.

Several Regional Final events are nearing capacity which presents an exciting challenge for event organisers.

For more information head to


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news