Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Women Lose in Laundry Stakes

Women Lose in Laundry Stakes

Does your washing machine have scud?

Auckland, 18 March 2014 – A survey of washing machine owners shows the nation’s women are still shouldering the brunt of laundry duties, despite record numbers of women in the labour market.

The Canstar Blue nationwide survey of 739 New Zealanders highlights the reality for many women; work doesn’t at the end of the business day. Eighty eight per cent of women in the survey say they do the majority of washing in their household, compared to 59 per cent of men.

Younger women fared slightly better but were still a long way from an equal division of laundry duties, says Derek Bonnar, Canstar New Zealand General Manager.

“Gen Y men do more laundry duty than their older counterparts, but it is still far less than Gen Y women. Data from Statistics New Zealand - in 2010 - showed that each day women spend an hour more than men on household chores. It doesn’t look like much has changed.”

How and when we wash our clothes
Half of those surveyed said they washed more than five loads of laundry a week and the economy of cold wash cycles appealed to nearly 60 per cent of respondents.

Topping the washing frequency stakes were Gen Xs – more likely to have young children – and those from Otago, with around 60 per cent from each group washing five or more loads of laundry each and every week.

For an average 7kg capacity washing machine that equates to 1.8 tonnes of washing every year, or in garment terms an annual laundry list of:

• 520 pairs of adult’s jeans
• 260 pairs of children’s jeans
• 780 shirts
• 520 sheets
• 520 pillow cases
• 780 tea towels
• 780 small towels

Around a third ignored care labels and washed all clothes on the same setting, says Bonnar.

“While that might save time, it could prove to be a false economy and shorten the life of delicate garments. One in three surveyed say they have ruined clothing by mixing colours and whites in the wash.”

Scud – the scourge of our dirty washing machines
Nearly 40 per cent of respondents say they didn’t know that the inside parts of a washing machine needs to be cleaned.

Manufacturers recommend those using fabric softener or favouring a cold wash cycle should clean the inside of their machine. The reaction between laundry powder and fabric softener is termed scud, and it’s nasty, says Bonnar.

“It’s a greasy deposit that clings to the unseen parts of a washing machine, especially where a cold cycle is used. Blobs can break off and deposit on clothes. Scud can be scud-daddled by regular cleaning and running a clothes-free hot wash cycle, complete with detergent.”

For more information on cleaning their washing machine, owners should consult their manual.

Euro brand Bosch again topped the survey with 5 star ratings across all categories, says Bonnar.

“This is the third year of victory for Bosch in the Canstar Blue Washing Machine Consumer Satisfaction survey. Bosch has struck the balance between price, performance and service and is reaping the rewards with consistently high customer satisfaction scores.”

The survey covered seven categories:

1. Overall satisfaction
2. Value for money
3. Performance
4. Reliability
5. Ease of Use
6. Quietness
7. Design
8. Warranty and service

About the survey
Canstar Blue commissions Colmar Brunton using the SSI Panel to regularly survey 2,500 New Zealand consumers to measure their satisfaction across a range of products and services. The outcomes reported here are the results from a survey of consumers who have purchased and used a new washing machine in the, in this case, 739 people. The survey has a margin of error of +/- 3.6%.

Age Groups:
Gen Y: 18-29
Gen X: 30-44
Baby Boomers: 45+

To view the full results of the Canstar Blue survey go to: www.canstarblue.co.nz

ENDs

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news