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Meet Da'Maha Organic: organic, fair-trade coconut water

24 March 2014

Meet Da'Maha Organic: an all-natural, organic, fair-trade coconut water that feeds, satisfies and sustains the mind and body

An all-new, 100% natural drink company, Da’Maha Organic, has recently launched its organic, fair trade coconut water, bringing a nutritionally superior experience to Kiwi fridges.

A passion for healthier, sustainable living led Nelson-based owners, Max and Nishkama Jones to launch their new drink, to ensure all New Zealanders could experience the difference.

“We absolutely love coconut water and wanted to create a nutritional beverage based on our ethos of organic, fair trade, and purity. The only better product we could offer is an actual coconut,” explains Mr Jones.

Coconut water is one of the fastest growing non-alcoholic beverages in the world. Not so long ago it was wasted on the factory floor in an effort to extract the meat of the coconut. Global coconut water sales today are fast approaching US$1 billion annually.

Da’Maha Organic is sourced from young, green coconuts on the island of Mindanao in the Philippines and with just one ingredient, - pure, organic coconut water - it is a drink with a powerful health kick.

It is rich in vitamins and minerals, with nearly twice as much potassium as a banana, to feed satisfy and sustain the body and mind.

Da’Maha, meaning ‘The Great’, offers similar hydration benefits as a sports drink, in an all-natural form, with five essential electrolytes. It also has zero fat, zero cholesterol and zero artificial flavours, sugars or preservatives.

As the only fair-trade certified coconut water in Australasia, Da’Maha prides itself on offering kiwis a healthy, replenishing drink that is also socially responsible. It is also packaged in 100% recyclable steel cans - one of the most recycled packaging materials in the world – and it is BPA-free.

“Our drink is about allowing Kiwis a healthier way of living, all-round. You can choose to be healthy and you can choose to be ethical and that’s where Da’Maha Organic has come from, it’s a healthy, ethical choice,” says Mr Jones.

The commitment to social responsibility does not end there. The company also has a vision to share its profits with local and international charities and groups.

“We are in the process of starting a charitable trust called The Maha’ni Foundation. Eventually kiwis will be able to follow ‘their’ money to see what they are contributing to,” says Mr Jones.

Da’Maha Organic is now available in over 190 locations nationwide including cafes, gyms and health stores. www.da-maha.com

About Da’Maha Organic Coconut Water
• Certified organic
• Certified fair trade
• Not made from concentrate
• BPA-free
• Recyclable steel can
• Five essential electrolytes for hydration (calcium, magnesium, phosphorous, sodium, and potassium)
• One can of Da’Maha contains almost twice as much potassium as a banana
• Coconut water is so similar to the make-up of our own blood that it has been used as an IV.
• Da’ Maha Organic is 100% NZ owned

About the owners
Max and Nishkama Jones moved to New Zealand three years ago from Northern California. Organic market gardeners by trade, they believe in the benefits of 100% natural products. Having moved to Nelson, they were surprised not to see an abundance of coconut water on the shelves, a personal favourite of theirs. The couple then set out to create an organic, fair trade product made in recyclable packaging. Their idea didn’t stop there though. With no personal need to line their own pockets, they are looking to share the profits, through the Maha’ni Foundation.

ENDS

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