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Tourism industry aligns for growth

Tourism industry aligns for growth


Wellington’s tourism sector is well positioned to support ambitious national targets set out by the Tourism 2025 framework, released today.

Tourism 2025 is a framework developed to unite the country’s tourism industry with an end goal of contributing $41 billion per year to the economy by 2025 - an increase of over 70% on current earnings.

Positively Wellington Tourism Chief Executive David Perks welcomes the vision and impact it will have on tourism in the capital.

“The past two decades have shown us that with the right investment and industry partnerships, significant change can occur. Not so long ago, Wellington barely featured on visitors’ itineraries – now it’s a leading destination regularly breaking its own records and making international headlines.”

In the past decade, Wellington has enjoyed a 49.7% increase in domestic commercial guest nights. Australian arrivals have also increased 49.1% over the past 10 years, driving an increase in total international arrivals of nearly 42%.

Visitors now spend over $1.6 billion in the Wellington region annually - over $3100 per minute.

Mr Perks says “it was smart development, coupled with a public-private partnership approach to tourism marketing that took the city to a new level as a visitor destination.”

The 1990s saw several key tourism infrastructural developments in Wellington over a short period of time, including Te Papa and Westpac Stadium, says Wellington City Council Economic Portfolio Leader Jo Coughlan

“The capital is well positioned to prosper further over the coming decade. Wellington City Council’s ‘8 Big Ideas’ Growth Agenda - which includes the creation of a film museum, increasing international air connections and adding to the city’s range of convention and concert facilities - perfectly positions our city to further lead growth for the nation’s tourism industry and economy.”

Investment under the umbrella of a national growth plan for the visitor sector will also provide confidence and surety to public and private investors, she says.

The national framework has also been welcomed by Wellington International Airport, which has seen a 70% increase in international visitors over the past decade.

Chief Executive Steven Sanderson says the airport’s vision for development between now and 2030 will play a key role in reaching the national growth targets.

“By 2030, we expect to welcome around 10 million passengers every year – that’s nearly double today’s number.

“In the next five years alone, we are planning to spend up to $250 million in travel and tourism infrastructure. Travellers will benefit immensely from an expanded and enhanced terminal that will continue to offer an efficient, friendly and innovative airport experience.”

The key to the success of Tourism 2025 is in working together towards an aspirational goal, under one shared vision and common framework, Mr Perks says.

“Over the past decade, Wellington’s tourism sector has demonstrated how, by working together and being ambitious, you can drive incredible change. Tourism 2025 will ensure the city and country’s competitive advantage on the world stage and increase the total value of our industry.”

:: Development of Tourism 2025 has been led by Tourism Industry Association New Zealand with strong support from industry and public sector leaders.

:: For more information visit www.tourism2025.co.nz


Ends…/

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