Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Summerset seeks to boost directors’ fee pool by 50%

Summerset seeks to boost directors’ fee pool by 50% as board gets rejig

By Paul McBeth

March 25 (BusinessDesk) - Summerset Group, the retirement village operator and developer, will ask shareholders for a 50 percent bump in the directors’ fee pool to account for a rejigged board, having delivered a 153 percent boost in the company’s stock price since it listed in 2011.

The Wellington-based company wants to lift the pool for directors’ fees to $600,000 from $400,000, which it says will compensate the directors who replaced representatives of former cornerstone shareholder Quadrant Private Equity, and chief executive’s Norah Barlow’s transition out of management next month. The higher fee pool would allow Summerset add another director.

“This increase in the fee pool is primarily necessary due to changes in the composition and size of the board,” the company said in its notice of annual meeting. “Based on recent research the proposed fees are in line with the fees paid to directors of comparable sized listed companies in New Zealand and below those of comparable sized companies in Australia.”

The $400,000 fee pool was set in November 2011 when Quadrant sold down its stake and listed the company on the NZX. Quadrant’s representatives on the board had taken lower fees than other non-executive directors, while Barlow didn’t receive director fees as managing director.

Quadrant sold the shares at $1.40 in the initial public offer, and the stock has soared 153 percent since then to $3.53, while paying dividends of 5.75 cents per share. Over the same time, the benchmark NZX 50 index gained 53 percent.

Summerset’s new fee structure would lift the chairman’s fee by $15,000 to $165,000, non-executive directors’ fees by $5,000 to $80,000, and raise the additional fee for chairing the audit committee by $5,000 to $15,000. The bigger pool would also cover a $7,500 fee for the chair of the remuneration committee.

Shareholders will also be asked to amend the company’s constitution to incorporate ASX listing rules to comply with its Australian dual-listing.

The annual meeting will be held in Wellington on April 30.

Last month the company reported annual profit more than doubled to a record $34 million in calendar 2013, as sales of occupation rights to its retirement units reached an all-time high.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Banks: Westpac Keeps Core Government Transactions Contract

The local arm of Westpac Banking Corp has kept its contract with the New Zealand government to provide core transactions, but will have to share peripheral services with its rivals. More>>


Science Investment Plan: Universities Welcome Statement

Universities New Zealand has welcomed the National Statement of Science Investment released by the Government today... this is a critical document as it sets out the Government’s ten-year strategic direction that will guide future investment in New Zealand’s science system. More>>


Scouring: Cavalier Merger Would Extract 'Monopoly Rents' - Godfrey Hirst

A merger of Cavalier Wool Holdings and New Zealand Wool Services International's two wool scouring operations would create a monopoly, says carpet maker Godfrey Hirst. The Commerce Commission on Friday released its second draft determination on the merger, maintaining its view that the public benefits would outweigh the loss of competition. More>>


Scoop Review Of Books: She Means Business

As Foreman says in her conclusion, this is a business book. It opens with a brief biographical section followed by a collection of interesting tips for entrepreneurs... More>>


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news