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New Zealanders aspire to the top jobs

New Zealanders aspire to the top jobs

Over half of us aspire to be a high-level executive, which goes some way to explain why there are so many small and medium-sized enterprises in New Zealand, according to recruiting experts Hays.

In a Hays survey of 472 New Zealanders, 57 per cent said they aspire to a position as a top executive and a further 27 per cent said they have ambition to work in mid to senior level management. But 16 per cent of respondents said they do not want to work in a management role.

According to Hays, the results suggest that the majority of professionals aspire to the C-suite. However, with a limited number of vacancies available for the top jobs, candidates will need to do everything they can to stand out from the competition.

“Top executives devise strategies and policies to ensure that an organisation meets its goals. They need to have a wide variety of skills and abilities to plan, direct, and coordinate a company’s operational activities,” says Jason Walker, Managing Director of Hays in New Zealand.

“A solid foundation and strong technical skills are important building blocks for an executive career. However, above all, companies value a strong operator. Executives who have made it to the top are those who have successfully used their expertise to become excellent operators, and combined their technical skills with the highest levels of people, management, communication and organisational skills. They also have commercial acumen and the ability to see the big picture and understand how every decision will impact the company’s future.”

“For New Zealanders, an alternative to achieving high-level executive status in the corporate world is for them set up a business on their own to gain an executive title,” says Jason. “Perhaps this explains why there are so many small and medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) in the country.”

SMEs of up to 20 employees are an important part of the New Zealand economy. According to the latest data from Statistics New Zealand, they account for 97.2 per cent of all enterprises, 30.2 per cent of all employees and an estimated 27.8 per cent of New Zealand’s GDP.

If you aspire to be a top executive, here are five tips from Hays to help you get there:

Develop commercial acumen - Developing a strong foundation in the commercial workings of business is essential for an aspiring high-level executive as many large companies prefer candidates who can create value for the company and who understand the company’s financial drivers. Typically, companies are looking for top executives who can develop a strategy and understand the commercial ramifications of business decisions.

Improve personal qualities - Top executives must have strong skills in the areas of communication, decision making, leadership, problem solving and management. You need to be able to communicate clearly and persuasively, effectively discuss issues and negotiate with others, direct subordinates, and explain policies and decisions to those within and outside the organisation.

Make individual development plans - A formal individual development plan can highlight on-the-job development activities that target specific areas for improvement. You can then think through the key lessons each experience can teach you prior to task commencement and reflect on what you learnt following the completion of an activity.

Continue education - Although education and training requirements vary widely by position and industry, many top executives have a bachelor’s or master’s degree in business administration or in an area related to their field of work. Company training programs, executive development programs, and certification can often benefit managers or executives hoping to advance, as can membership of the relevant industry bodies.

Gain work experience - Many top executives advance within their own organisation, moving up from lower level managerial or supervisory positions. However, other companies may prefer to hire qualified candidates from outside their organisation. Regardless, successful top executives have all continued to add to their skills by gaining as much experience as they can. So look for opportunities both within and without to continuously develop your skills base.

In their final piece of advice, Hays also suggest you focus on your personal qualities, such as decision-making skills. “If you want to be a part of the C-suite, you must assess different options and choose the best course of action, often on a daily basis,” says Jason.

“Top executives need good problem-solving skills and the ability to recognise shortcomings and effectively carry out solutions.

“For those who wish to become a top executive, knowing which skills and abilities matter most is essential for success and will go a long way towards differentiating you from the competition.”

Hays, the world’s leading recruiting experts in qualified, professional and skilled people.

ENDS

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