Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Launch of Value Case for Prefab

Media Release – embargoed until Thursday 27 March, 1pm

New Zealand urgently needs more quality, cost effective housing and its prefabrication design and construction industry is gearing up to respond.

“New Zealand is heading into a building boom and our design and construction industry is at a crucial tipping point in the uptake of prefabrication and offsite technologies”, says Pamela Bell, PrefabNZ CEO. “We are looking to prefab lessons from Germany and Scandinavia as ways to build more houses, more quickly, and at higher quality using indoor facilities.”

International examples of the benefits of prefabrication were outlined today at the PrefabNZ National Conference with the launch of the Value Case for Prefab. Presented to over 130 design and construction delegates from as far afield as Australia, America and Korea, the Value Case for Prefab highlights the significant wall of work the New Zealand industry faces and provides the evidence to show that through the use of prefabricated construction methodologies New Zealand can have better quality homes, faster.

“A number of factors stop prefabricated technology from being used more in mainstream design and construction and the primary issue is public perception,” says Pamela. The development of the Value Case follows the release of the Prefab Roadmap last year, which showed that misconception is one of the key challenges facing the uptake of prefabricated technology. Many people still associate the term ‘prefab’ with temporary school classrooms. In fact, as viewers of television shows like ‘Grand Designs’ will appreciate, prefabrication is simply a way to build in bigger chunks. Prefabrication, or offsite construction, is a strategy that affects the whole project, pulling together designers, builders and clients in the early stages of a construction project, and resulting in manufacture of substantial parts of the building prior to assembly at the final location.

A typical 157 square metre prefabricated home can deliver a 15% saving in build cost compared with traditional construction, not to mention the increased value it generates through delivering a better quality product. “Time is money,” says Pamela. “It is easy to just look at the bottom line of a building project, but the true savings come when the project is finished sooner and the clients are in a warmer, weathertight, more sustainable home”.

The Value Case also outlines some of the other economic and social benefits to building offsite, including less noise and disruption for neighbours, better conditions for construction workers, less overall material waste, and known costs and timeframes.

Developed with support from the Productivity Partnership and BRANZ, the Value Case for Prefab forms part of the overall strategy for increasing the uptake of prefabrication technology in New Zealand.

“The opportunity is clear”, says Pamela, “and PrefabNZ is passionate about working together with the government and industry to help drive the change to deliver better housing solutions for New Zealanders.”

For more information visit http://www.prefabnz.com/News/ValueCase/

ENDS


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Final Frontier: Rocket Lab And NASA Sign Commercial Space Launch Agreement

Rocket Lab has signed a Commercial Space Launch Act Agreement with the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The agreement enables Rocket Lab to use NASA resources - including personnel, facilities and equipment - for launch and reentry efforts. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Wheeler Downplays Scope For ‘Large’ Rates Fall

Reserve Bank governor Graeme Wheeler says some market commentators are predicting further declines in interest rates that would only make sense for an economy in recession, although some easing is likely to be needed to maintain New Zealand’s economic growth. More>>

ALSO:

Ruataniwha Dam: Consent Conditions Could Mean Reduced Intensity

Legal advice sought by the Hawke’s Bay Regional Council on the Ruataniwha Dam consent conditions has confirmed that farmers who sign up to take water from the dam could be required to reduce the intensity of their farming operation to meet the catchment’s strict nitrogen limit. More>>

Health And Safety: Bill Now Sees Rules Relaxed For Small Businesses

Health and safety law reform sparked by the Pike River coalmine disaster has been reported back from the industrial relations select committee with weakened requirements on small businesses to appoint health and safety representatives and committees. More>>

ALSO:

Bearing Fruit: Annual Fruit Exports Hit $2 Billion For First Time

The value of fruit exported rose 20 percent (up $330 million) for the June 2015 year when compared with the year ended June 2014. Both higher prices and a greater quantity of exports (up 9.0 percent) contributed to the overall rise. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news