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Development of airport’s second runway by around 2025

Development of airport’s second runway by around 2025

Auckland Airport will build a northern runway by around 2025 to cater for growth in passengers, cargo and larger aircraft.

The second runway will be located to the north of the new terminal and will run parallel with the existing southern runway. It will have an operational length of up to 2,150 metres and restrictions on flights to and from the east at night. It will be built entirely on airport-owned land and without the need for any reclamation of the Manukau Harbour.

The second runway was originally approved 12 years ago but was not built due to demand dropping during the global financial crisis. Passenger travel is recovering strongly following the global financial downturn and the second runway will be needed.

Auckland Airport chief executive, Adrian Littlewood, says, “We’ve always planned well ahead and the timing and the shape of the second runway have evolved to reflect feedback from airlines about their needs and to meet the changing demands of new aircraft.”

“The airlines prefer domestic operations to stay close to the existing runway. The new northern runway will be primarily used for the modern, larger and quieter international aircraft, such as the Airbus 320 and the Boeing 777 and 787. We will move it a little to the north to have enough space between the two runways to handle the bigger planes.”

“We need to build the second runway when aircraft movements can no longer be accommodated on a single runway. The new combined domestic and international terminal will be needed earlier than the new runway.”

“At some point beyond 2044 the northern runway’s operating length may also need to be extended by approximately 890 metres to improve its efficiency and meet the requirements of the larger aircraft forecast to fly into Auckland in the future. We are applying now through the Auckland Council’s Unitary Plan process to be able to extend the second runway when demand ultimately requires it.”

“We have always planned well ahead and provided early information to the communities neighbouring the airport and other stakeholders. We will be holding community briefings in April to explain our plans in more detail,” says Mr Littlewood.

Ends

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