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Brother Scanncut Dominates Global Craft & Innovation Awards

31 March 2014

Brother Scanncut Dominates Global Craft & Innovation Awards

Fresh off its successful launch in New Zealand, Brother’s state-of-the-art craft machine, the ScanNCut, has received global recognition at three prestigious crafting, innovation and design awards.

The first of its kind in the crafting market, the Brother ScanNCut won first place for The Craft & Hobby Association’s “Hot 20 Awards”, in the USA, acknowledging the most creative craft products of 2014.

The ScanNCut was also selected as one of the “Top Show Stoppers” at the CES 2014 Innovation & Design Awards, recognising ground-breaking technologies for home, work or play. CES is the world’s biggest home electrical appliance trade show held annually in Las Vegas.

And most recently, the Brother ScanNCut won “Creative Tool of the Year” at the biggest craft show in Europe, Creativeworld.

Brother International (NZ) COO, Matthew Stroud, said these prominent awards back what’s been an incredibly successful launch into the New Zealand market.

“Since launching in February, ScanNCut has garnered an overwhelmingly positive response from retailers and customers throughout New Zealand,” he said.

“We call this machine ‘the best thing to happen to craft since the scissors’, because it’s the answer to what so many scrapbookers, crafters and sewers have been asking for.”

The Brother ScanNCut is a natural progression in the organisation’s ongoing commitment to empower individual creativity and lead innovation in this new craft category.

“We are the industry leader in the sewing market, and our goal is to now lead the craft market through unique and creative technology, and our ‘At Your Side’ philosophy,” Stroud said.

The Brother ScanNCut takes an image, photograph or hand-drawn sketch, scans it, and then precisely cuts any desired shape or outline. The high resolution built-in scanner means outline designs can be created without the use of a PC.

With two models available, craft lovers are able to effortlessly scan and cut the most intricate designs onto a wide range of materials including card, poster board, cotton, felt, denim, vinyl, leather, canvas and more.

Brother ScanNCut: (model CM110)
Paper cutting only: RRP $599.95

Brother ScanNCut: (model CM550DX)
Paper & fabric cutting: RRP $699.95

The Brother ScanNCut is available now from leading craft suppliers and Brother stockists nationwide. Or phone 0800 329 111 to find your nearest stockist.

Brother NZ – Sewing & Craft is on Facebook!

About Brother NZ
Brother has been in the New Zealand market for over 50 years, and in that time has grown to be the leading provider of sewing machines, print and imaging equipment, and labelling hardware in New Zealand.

It services the retail, corporate and business-to-business markets and offers an array of services.

Brother takes Corporate Social Responsibility seriously and follows the three basic policies of the Brother Group worldwide; “commitment to quality”, “customer first” and “care for the environment”. This is illustrated in its Carbon Zero certification, ISO 14001 Environmental standards and ISO 9001 Quality standard certification.

The Brother recycling programme is unparalleled within the New Zealand market and is recognised as the most comprehensive programme by Brother globally.

Brother also supports numerous community initiatives through sponsorships, and supports the Pacific Cooperation Foundation. This emphasises Brother’s commitment and desire to serve the community locally and globally.


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