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Draft Marine Consent application filed

Media Release
31 March 2014

Chatham Rock Phosphate files draft Marine Consent application

Chatham Rock Phosphate today submitted a draft Marine Consent application to the Environmental Protection Authority - the culmination of four years work and more than $25 million in investment.

The Marine Consent is the only major licence CRP now needs, having gained a mining permit for its phosphate extraction project in December. The EPA, New Zealand’s environmental regulator, is expected to decide on CRP’s application in November after a full public process.

Including the proceeds of the rights issue presently underway, Chatham has raised over $27 million from its existing shareholders and through placements to qualified investors to finance extensive spending on science-based research.

Managing Director Chris Castle said the CRP team was very proud of the work contained in the application.
“Rigourous research by scientists has considered the relevant facets of what we propose and demonstrates how we can minimise and mitigate environmental impacts.

“We sincerely appreciate the input from all of our stakeholders that has contributed to our thinking. We believe our work will satisfy any issues raised.

“Having done our homework, we know this project stacks up technically, environmentally and financially.”

Mr Castle said the CRP’s phosphate resource, located on the seabed of the Chatham Rise, offers fertiliser security for New Zealand’s primary industry, has big export and import substitution potential, as well as environmental benefits, making it a project of national significance.

The Environmental Impact Assessment forming the centrepiece of the Marine Consent application will be considered under the Exclusive Economic Zone environmental consenting regime that came into force in June last year as part of the EEZ and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) legislation.

Supplementing the 459-page main document are more than 30 appendices, mostly scientific reports and models. The information in the EIA will be publicly available on the EPA website, and via a link on rockphosphate.co.nz, once the EPA has accepted the application as complete. People are then able to read the information, make submissions and attend public hearings during the next six months.

ENDS

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