Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Draft Marine Consent application filed

Media Release
31 March 2014

Chatham Rock Phosphate files draft Marine Consent application

Chatham Rock Phosphate today submitted a draft Marine Consent application to the Environmental Protection Authority - the culmination of four years work and more than $25 million in investment.

The Marine Consent is the only major licence CRP now needs, having gained a mining permit for its phosphate extraction project in December. The EPA, New Zealand’s environmental regulator, is expected to decide on CRP’s application in November after a full public process.

Including the proceeds of the rights issue presently underway, Chatham has raised over $27 million from its existing shareholders and through placements to qualified investors to finance extensive spending on science-based research.

Managing Director Chris Castle said the CRP team was very proud of the work contained in the application.
“Rigourous research by scientists has considered the relevant facets of what we propose and demonstrates how we can minimise and mitigate environmental impacts.

“We sincerely appreciate the input from all of our stakeholders that has contributed to our thinking. We believe our work will satisfy any issues raised.

“Having done our homework, we know this project stacks up technically, environmentally and financially.”

Mr Castle said the CRP’s phosphate resource, located on the seabed of the Chatham Rise, offers fertiliser security for New Zealand’s primary industry, has big export and import substitution potential, as well as environmental benefits, making it a project of national significance.

The Environmental Impact Assessment forming the centrepiece of the Marine Consent application will be considered under the Exclusive Economic Zone environmental consenting regime that came into force in June last year as part of the EEZ and Continental Shelf (Environmental Effects) legislation.

Supplementing the 459-page main document are more than 30 appendices, mostly scientific reports and models. The information in the EIA will be publicly available on the EPA website, and via a link on, once the EPA has accepted the application as complete. People are then able to read the information, make submissions and attend public hearings during the next six months.


© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Welcome Home: Record High Migration Stokes 41-Year High Population Growth

New Zealand annual net migration hit a new high in October as more people arrived from than departed for Australia for the first time in more than 20 years. More>>


Citizens' Advice Bureau: Report Shows Desperate Housing Situation Throughout NZ

CAB's in-depth analysis of over 2000 client enquiries about emergency accommodation shows vulnerable families, pregnant women and children living in cars and garages, even after seeking assistance from the Ministry of Social Development and Housing New Zealand. More>>


Speaking For The Bees: Greens Call For Neonicotinoid Pesticide Ban

The National Government should ban the use of controversial pesticides called neonicotinoids after evidence has revealed that even at low doses they cause harm to bee populations, the Green Party said today. More>>


Science Awards: NZAS Celebrate NZ Scientific Achievements

The Marsden Medal is awarded for a lifetime of outstanding service to the cause or profession of science, in recognition of service rendered to the cause or profession of science in the widest connotation of the phrase. This year’s medal is awarded to Dr Mike Andrews. More>>


Court Rules: Affco 'Unlawfully' Locked Out Meat Workers

The note says the full court found for the plaintiffs, "that is that the defendant locked out the second plaintiffs unlawfully and that it breached s 32 of the Act by acting otherwise than in good faith towards the plaintiffs while collective bargaining was still going on." More>>


New Bill Introduced: GST On Online Services

These measures are an important first step in the Government’s efforts to deal with increasing volumes of online services and other intangibles purchased from overseas suppliers that should, under New Zealand’s tax rules, be subject to GST. More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news