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ADLSI Appoints Documents and Precedents Manager

ADLSI Appoints Documents and Precedents Manager

Auckland, 2 April 2014 – Auckland District Law Society Incorporated (ADLSI) today announced the appointment of England and Wales qualified solicitor and barrister, Ben Thomson to the role of documents and precedents manager.

As part of the ADLSI management team supporting member lawyers across the country, Thomson’s primary responsibilities are managing and maintaining ADLSI’s portfolio of legal forms and documents such as the widely used agreement for sale and purchase of real estate, overseeing the review and update of the Legal Practice Manual and providing secretarial support to four ADLSI committees.

Thomson, who studied law at Kings College, London, has experience in the areas of family law and defendant insurance litigation as well as contract law, property law and criminal law. He worked for Wales’ largest law firm, Hugh James, before moving to a smaller practice where he had the opportunity to practice childcare law.

Sue Keppel, ADLSI chief executive, says Ben Thomson is a high calibre candidate who has settled in well in his first few weeks with the organisation.

“I am delighted to welcome Ben to Auckland District Law Society. The documents and precedents committee fulfils an important role providing standard forms that are used by lawyers throughout New Zealand. As the manager for this committee Ben will play a crucial part in ensuring that ADLSI forms retain their currency and high rate of use by our sector.”

About ADLSI
ADLSI is an independent membership organisation representing the New Zealand legal profession. Supported by a membership of over 2,600, with an unsurpassed knowledge of the law and a commitment to make that available to the public, ADLSI operates 16 legal committees, delivers a highly regarded CPD programme, produces over 140 widely used legal forms, operates a successful online Webforms portal, as well as an inspired calendar of events to connect the profession. In addition it produces a weekly hard copy legal publication, Law News, and a weekly e-bulletin covering 10 legal cases, both of which, are provided free to ADLSI members.

ENDS

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