Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

NZ dollar falls on concern about lower dairy prices

NZ dollar falls on concern lower dairy commodity prices may weigh on economy

By Tina Morrison

April 3 (BusinessDesk) – The New Zealand dollar was the worst-performing major currency overnight on speculation lower dairy commodity prices will weigh on economic growth.

The kiwi was the worst performing currency tracked by Reuters overnight, falling as low 85.45 US cents after rising as high as 87 cents earlier this week. The local currency was at 85.58 cents at 8am in Wellington from 86.02 cents at 5pm yesterday. The trade-weighted index fell to 80 from 80.37 yesterday.

Investors reduced their New Zealand dollar holdings after dairy product prices had the biggest drop in almost 20 months at yesterday’s Fonterra Cooperative Group GlobalDairyTrade auction, with whole milk powder falling to its lowest level in more than a year. That marked the fourth straight decline in auction prices and raised concerns about the outlook for New Zealand’s 40-year high terms of trade, which are seen as a factor underpinning accelerating economic growth this year.

“Globally the market is focusing on dairy trade,” said Sam Tuck, senior foreign exchange strategist at ANZ Bank New Zealand. “It is a clear signal to not only New Zealanders but also the globe that a 40-year high peak in terms of trade can’t be considered a one-way bet.

“It was a catalyst for a correction back to where we have been recently, rather than a complete game changer,” Tuck said. “The kiwi had got too high, within a cent and a half of its post-float high.”

ANZ expects the New Zealand dollar to decline to 83 US cents by the end of the second quarter as the US economy improves. Traders will be looking to tonight’s ISM non-manufacturing survey and tomorrow’s payroll report to gauge how the world’s largest economy is tracking, Tuck said.

“Our central expectation is for continued pressure on the New Zealand dollar from here,” Tuck said.

The kiwi will likely trade between 85 US cents and 86.10 cents today, ANZ said.

The New Zealand dollar dropped to 92.55 Australian cents from 93.06 cents yesterday. Today, Reserve Bank of Australia governor Glenn Stevens is scheduled to speak at a business lunch to the American Chamber of Commerce in Australia and Australia also has data on retail sales and international trade.

The local currency slipped to 62.18 euro cents from 62.31 cents yesterday ahead of the European Central Bank meeting today.

The kiwi fell to 51.48 British pence from 51.73 pence yesterday and weakened to 88.81 yen from 89.30 yen.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Snail-ier Mail: NZ Post To Ditch FastPost

New Zealand Post customers will see a change to how they can send priority mail from 1 January 2018. The FastPost service will no longer be available from this date. More>>

ALSO:

Property Institute: English Backs Of Debt To Income Plan

Property Institute of New Zealand Chief Executive Ashley Church is applauding today’s decision, by Prime Minister Bill English, to take Debt-to-income ratios off the table as a tool available to the Reserve Bank. More>>

ALSO:

Divesting: NZ Super Fund Shifts Passive Equities To Low-Carbon

The NZ$35 billion NZ Super Fund’s NZ$14 billion global passive equity portfolio, 40% of the overall Fund, is now low-carbon, the Guardians of New Zealand Superannuation announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Split Decision - Appeal Planned: EPA Allows Taranaki Bight Seabed Mine

The Decision-making Committee, appointed by the Board of the Environmental Protection Authority to decide a marine consent application by Trans-Tasman Resources Ltd, has granted consent, subject to conditions, for the company to mine iron sands off the South Taranaki Bight. More>>

ALSO:

New Report: Waitākere Kauri - Look After It, Or Lose It

With no cure for kauri dieback disease and treatment options still being trialled, the Auckland region faces a very real threat – take urgent action in the Waitākere Ranges or risk losing kauri from our forests altogether. More>>

ALSO: