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Jobs market full of opportunity

7 April 2014

Jobs market full of opportunity

The New Zealand job market continues to thrive, according to an analysis of over 50,000 roles listed on Trade Me Jobs in the first quarter of 2014.

Head of Trade Me Jobs, Peter Osborne, said the number of job listings on the site had lifted 21% year-on-year, following on from a 17% lift in the final quarter of 2013.

“The national employment market is flourishing with Auckland, Wellington and Canterbury all seeing positive growth,” Mr Osborne said. “With more roles being advertised, Kiwis hunting that dream job are looking well-placed to consider their next career move.

“Our analysis aligns with recent data from Westpac McDermott Miller which found that employment confidence is at an all-time high since the recession. The New Zealand job market is looking very rosy.”

Mr Osborne said there was plenty of opportunity for employers too with recent research commissioned by Trade Me Jobs finding that 45% of employees were willing to relocate for a new job. “Employers should be confident there are plenty of potential candidates willing to consider the right role even if they’re not on the doorstep.”

More than half of employees (62%) cited better pay as their primary motivation for considering moving to a new location, but other factors included being made redundant, career development and a desire to relocate. “With the surge in job listings, now is a good time for anyone contemplating that next great role to put their thinking into action.”

The national picture
The Auckland region remains the powerhouse of the national job market, said Mr Osborne. “The City of Sails saw a 20% boost in job listings when compared to the same period last year, with central Auckland and Manukau experiencing significant jumps in year-on-year growth.”

Those working in central Auckland could also expect the highest average pay of the country, taking home an average annual salary of $72,302. This was ahead of previous leader central Wellington ($70,234), and New Plymouth (61,143).

Canterbury job listings were up 24% on the same time last year, with Christchurch city’s available roles also ticking up 24%. “It’s been a long process, but the rebuilding efforts in the area are still the primary motivators for activity in the employment market,” said Mr Osborne. Industries that experienced growth in Christchurch city included manufacturing (up 59%), transport (up 45%), trades (up 37%) and construction (up 34%).

Mr Osborne said Wellington was recently revealed as the most desirable New Zealand destination to head to for a new job. “We saw 18% of respondents choose the capital, while the Bay of Plenty was next with 14% of the vote,” he said. “The job market in Wellington is in good shape for new arrivals, with a 26% tick up in advertised roles on a year ago.”

There was also good news for the deep south. “We saw a huge lift in advertised roles in Southland, with a 41% increase,” he said. “We saw good growth in agriculture, trades, and healthcare. Jobs out on the pasture aren’t in short supply either, with advertised roles for farming up 113%.”

The number of roles advertised in the Taranaki region also lifted significantly, up 16% on a year ago.

In the sectors
“The need for skilled IT workers is reflected in the sector’s dominance of average pay packets,” Mr Osborne said. “Four of the top five are filled by IT architects, IT sales, IT project managers and IT managers, all taking home an average pay packet between $128,000 and $134,000 a year.”

Sectors seeing increased listings this quarter when compared to the same period last year included IT sales (up 166%), journalism (up 156%) and retail department manager roles (up 131%).

The future
Mr Osborne said the stand-out motivation for Kiwis to shift roles was remuneration. “As mortgage rates rise, so too does the desire for a better pay check at the end of the week. With perceptions of job opportunities markedly improving, and recent signs that firms are looking to step up their hiring efforts, it’s becoming a job hunter’s market.

"High salaries in IT are great for people working in those sectors, but research has also shown they are among the least likely of professions to move roles. Combined with a real skills shortage, this can only mean that IT professionals will continue to dominate the high salaried roles in the foreseeable future and in contrast to many other sectors the industry will find it increasingly difficult to land good, experienced IT staff.”

Trade Me Jobs employment survey results: Jan - Mar 2014

1. Listings growth by job: Q1/2014

JobYear-on-year %change Q1/2014 vs Q1/2013
Agriculture, fishing & forestry34.0
Banking, finance & insurance- 9.7
Construction & architecture26.9
Customer service22.6
Government & council- 18.9
Hospitality & tourism27.1
HR & recruitment45.7
Legal- 18.0
Manufacturing & operations35.8
Marketing, media & communications29.4
Office & administration16.0
Other- 5.5
Science & technology17.1
Trades & services40.4
Transport & logistics28.4

2. Average rates of pay by job (full-time jobs only): Q1/2014

Highest paid Pay rate ($)
1Doctors & specialists147,928
2IT architects 134,547
3IT sales & pre-sales130,174
4IT project managers 130,079
5IT managers 128,309
Lowest paid Pay rate ($)
1Kitchen staff33,322
3Reception & front desk34,430
5Retail assistants 35,986

3. Listings growth by region for Q1/2014

Region% change vs Q1 2013
Bay of Plenty24.1
Hawke’s Bay3.2
West Coast22.8

4. Average rates of pay by region (full-time jobs only): Q1/2014

Highest paid Pay rate ($)
1Auckland City72,302
2Wellington 70,234
3New Plymouth 61,143
Lowest paidPay rate ($)
4Upper Hutt45,736

NB: Segments with less than 50 jobs excluded.

About Trade Me Jobs
Since launching back in 2006, Trade Me Jobs has become a great success averaging over 50,000 daily unique visitors*. We’re proud to provide opportunities galore for our 3 million plus members to find the job of their dreams.

Full details of pay by profession for full-time jobs listed between July and December 2013 are in the Trade Me Jobs Salary Guide.

*Source: Nielsen Market Intelligence, Avg. daily UB’s, Jan – Dec 2013.


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