Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Japan-Australia deal makes TPP even more important

Media Release

8 April 2014

Japan-Australia deal makes TPP even more important

The recently-concluded economic partnership agreement between Australia and Japan makes a high quality TPP outcome even more important, according to the New Zealand red meat sector.

The bilateral agreement will lower Japan’s tariffs on Australian beef products, over time, to about half of the 38.5% that is applied to exports from other countries, including New Zealand. This will give Australian beef producers a significant advantage in the Japanese market.

“Without a comprehensive, high quality TPP, we’re now going to have a competitive disadvantage in our fifth-largest beef market, and our largest market for chilled beef. We’ve always placed a lot of importance on a successful and high quality TPP deal that removes all tariffs on our exports,” said Meat Industry Association Chairman Bill Falconer.

“We’re confident that New Zealand’s negotiators are doing their best to get us there, regardless of this kind of distraction.”

Beef + Lamb New Zealand Chairman James Parsons said the Australia-Japan deal was much less ambitious than a typical New Zealand FTA and was “in a completely different league” to the ongoing TPP negotiations.

“A high quality deal means complete tariff elimination on all products of trade interest – that’s basically what New Zealand has achieved in its FTAs. It’s disappointing to see Australia and Japan not get up to that standard, particularly while we’re all in the middle of trying to finish a very high quality TPP agreement.”

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Superu Report: Land Regulation Drives Auckland House Prices

Land use regulation is responsible for up to 56 per cent of the cost of an average house in Auckland according to a new research report quantifying the impact of land use regulations, Finance Minister Steven Joyce says. More>>

ALSO:

Fletcher Whittled: Fletcher Dumps Adamson In Face Of Dissatisfaction

Fletcher Building has taken the unusual step of dumping its chief executive, Mark Adamson, as the company slashed its full-year earnings guidance and flagged an impairment against Australian assets. More>>

ALSO:

No More Dog Docking: New Animal Welfare Regulations Progressed

“These 46 regulations include stock transport, farm husbandry, companion and working animals, pigs, layer hens and the way animals are accounted for in research, testing and teaching.” More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Most Kiwifruit Contractors Breaking Law

A Labour Inspectorate operation targeting the kiwifruit industry in Bay of Plenty has found the majority of labour hire contractors are breaching their obligations as employers. More>>

ALSO:

'Work Experience': Welfare Group Opposes The Warehouse Workfare

“This programme is about exploiting unemployed youth, not teaching them skills. The government are subsidising the Warehouse in the name of reducing benefit dependency,” says Vanessa Cole, spokesperson for Auckland Action Against Poverty. More>>

ALSO:

Internet Taxes: Labour To Target $600M In Unpaid Taxes From Multinationals

The Labour Party would target multinationals operating in New Zealand to ensure they don't avoid paying tax if it wins power and is targeting $600 million over three years through a "diverted profits tax," says leader Andrew Little. More>>

ALSO: