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New leader and era for NZ cooperatives

8 April 2014
New leader and era for NZ cooperatives

New Chief Executive of Cooperative Business New Zealand (, Ian Macintosh, is looking forward to promoting the significant contributions which his organisation’s members make to the Kiwi economy and society.

Cooperatives - also known as ‘co-ops’ or ‘mutual organisations’- exist for the mutual benefit of their shareholders/members and, together, share a proud tradition. As the sector’s advocate,Cooperative Business champions the interests of this country’s cooperative companies.

An experienced trade executive and community volunteer, Mr Macintosh has been appointed by the Cooperative Business board to lead its new, Auckland-based operation starting this month (April).

In announcing the appointment, Board Chair, Jonathan Lee, said cooperatives were a vitally important part of the New Zealand economic landscape – from Fonterra to Foodstuffs and many more.

“Together co-ops account for three percent of gross domestic profit (GDP), employ 43,000 people and turn over $41 billion a year,” said Mr Lee, Chief Operating Officer of the New Zealand Association of Credit Unions (NZACU), itself one of Cooperative Business’ larger members.

“Ian will help us raise the profile of co-ops both large and small, highlighting their value to New Zealand.”

While visiting the UK before officially starting his new role, Mr Macintosh was invited to meet Dame Pauline Green, President of the International Cooperative Alliance, and the Secretary-General of Cooperatives UK, Ed Mayo. The meetings served to increase Mr Macintosh’s keen interest in the cooperative sector and strengthen his understanding of what it takes for co-ops from a host of countries to prosper, providing insights to international best practice.

“Co-ops are all about partnership and on behalf of our members, Cooperative Business is very keen to work closely with central government – both politicians and officials – as well as the private and academic sectors.

“Among my key priorities is to strengthen these connections to ensure our louder co-op voice is not only heard, but our partners are motivated to help our sector grow and deliver even greater economic and social dividends for New Zealand,” he said.


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