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Wellington Startup lands to assist Facebook in San Francisco

Wellington Startup lands to assist Facebook at San Francisco HQ

The SaaS company PocketRent‘s team has arrived in Facebook’s Menlo Park offices today to discuss their contributions to the new Hack programming language developed by Facebook and a handful of key community members.

PocketRent’s forthcoming Pro edition utilises the same underlying systems as Facebook in order to maximise the user experience through performance increases, extending the already fantastic PocketRent product offering for Landlords and Property Managers.

PocketRent has already won the recognition of a range of prestigious organisations across the globe, most recently receiving an all-expenses paid invitation to the launch of Facebook’s Hack programming language event. The invitation was extended in recognition of PocketRent developers Simon Welsh and James Miller’s contributions to the Facebook code, including but not limited to their quick-start framework named ‘BeatBox’.

Product Manager Mark Huser said, “We are really excited to be working with Facebook’s talented HHVM team to bring improvements to code with the Hack programming language which is being announced publically today at Facebook HQ in Menlo Park. By investing in Hack together with Facebook and its massive userbase as well as other community contributors, we can assist in creating the next generation of code to ensure the improvement of web services now for our products and many SaaS based software in the future.”

PocketRent has already established itself as a comprehensive property management tool for a collection of clients across the globe, from Australia and New Zealand to the UK, US and South Africa. The new foundations being implemented for the cloud based SaaS app optimises and refines the already astounding features of the tool, giving property managers more power and flexibility than ever before.

Satisfied accounting partner of PocketRent, Porsche Cheeung says “I want to compliment you for bringing us such a good looking piece of software. I just started using PocketRent but already love the look and feel – very easy to use.”

Intuitive, effective and accessible, PocketRent adds fluidity and flexibility to the often complex communication processes linking landlords and tenants. It is supremely flexible, allowing for access any time and anywhere, multiple user accounts and shared management administration as well as offering the peace of mind that comes from automatic rent management, ensuring lease monies are paid on time.

Regardless of portfolio size, PocketRent is the ideal management tool for any property administrator, from independent landlords to national firms.

To learn more about PocketRent or to sign up for a free one month trial visit



About PocketRent: PocketRent is a property management tool offering landlords, investors and property managers a comprehensive platform for easily managing all aspects of the property management process. Made in Wellington, New Zealand, the system is personal, interactive and has the potential to save B2C and B2B users vast amounts of time and money.

About PocketRent Pro: Building on the already revolutionising features of PocketRent, PocketRent Pro extends cloud based technology to make property management easier and more flexible than ever. Users are able to access accounts from mobile devices such as smartphones and tablets, making day to day property management available from anywhere, anytime.

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