Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Wellington film sector goes from strength to strength

Wellington film sector goes from strength to strength


Official figures released today show Wellington continues to lead the country’s film industry, with businesses in the region earning $700 million from films in 2013 – 81 percent of all film revenue in New Zealand.

Statistics New Zealand’s 2012/2013 Screen Industry Survey found that Wellington earned the lion’s share of feature film revenue and revenue from post-production work and digital effects.

While the $700 million in feature film revenue is a drop from a record high in 2012 when the Wellington region earned $828 million from film – it is still $200 million more than in 2011.

Of that, $495 million was earned in post-production, up nine percent on last year and representing 75 percent of New Zealand’s total. Furthermore, 62 percent of the country’s post-production businesses are based in the Wellington region.

Gerard Quinn, Chief Executive of Grow Wellington, the region’s economic development agency says this is yet another excellent result for the screen sector. Through its screen programme Film Wellington, Grow Wellington works closely with the sector and promotes the region as a screen production destination.

“We’ve seen a number of major foreign-financed projects come to Wellington, both for production and post-production. All this international revenue flows into the regional economy,” says Mr Quinn.

“As well as the big players, a large number of mid-tier and emerging businesses are taking their skills to a global market. All these businesses provide work for people with outstanding creative and technical skills and help to attract talent from overseas.”

Mr Quinn says that screen revenue will begin to balance out between the regions – Auckland is particularly strong in TV production – as recent changes to government incentives see a shift from fee-for-service to original content creation and exploitation.

“Wellington’s high end international television capability is poised to re-emerge and evolve along with transmedia and gaming. New platforms will open up new audiences and new markets.

“We congratulate the Wellington screen sector on yet another great result.”

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Water: Farming Leaders Pledge To Help Make Rivers Swimmable

In a first for the country, farming leaders have pledged to work together to help make New Zealand’s rivers swimmable for future generations. More>>

ALSO:

Unintended Consequences: Liquor Change For Grocery Stores On Tobacco Tax

Changes in the law made to enable grocery stores to continue holding liquor licences to sell alcohol despite increases in tobacco taxes will take effect on 15 September 2017. More>>

Back Again: Government Approves TPP11 Mandate

Trade Minister Todd McClay says New Zealand will be pushing for the minimal number of changes possible to the original TPP agreement, something that the remaining TPP11 countries have agreed on. More>>

ALSO:

By May 2018: Wider, Earlier Microbead Ban

The sale and manufacture of wash-off products containing plastic microbeads will be banned in New Zealand earlier than previously expected, Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Snail-ier Mail: NZ Post To Ditch FastPost

New Zealand Post customers will see a change to how they can send priority mail from 1 January 2018. The FastPost service will no longer be available from this date. More>>

ALSO:

Property Institute: English Backs Of Debt To Income Plan

Property Institute of New Zealand Chief Executive Ashley Church is applauding today’s decision, by Prime Minister Bill English, to take Debt-to-income ratios off the table as a tool available to the Reserve Bank. More>>

ALSO: