Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


NZ food prices fall in March on cheaper cakes and candy

NZ food prices fall in March on cheaper cakes and candy

By Suze Metherell

April 11 (BusinessDesk) – New Zealand food prices fell in March as cheaper cakes and candy drove a fall in grocery prices, and offset more expensive meat and produce.

The food price index fell 0.3 percent in March following a 1 percent fall in February, according to Statistics New Zealand. Food prices rose 1.2 percent on an annual basis, the first time all five components of the index increased since September 2011.

The monthly decline was led by a 1.6 percent drop in grocery prices to their lowest level since August as cakes and biscuit prices and confectionary, nuts and snacks both dropped 3.5 percent. In the year grocery prices made the smallest gains of all the subgroups, up 0.2 percent, led by an 8.8 percent gain in fresh milk and a 7.1 percent rise in cheese prices.

Last month the Reserve Bank embarked on a tightening cycle, lifting interest rates 25 basis points to 2.75 percent as it tries to stem inflationary pressure in the economy. Food prices make up almost 19 percent of the consumer price index, the inflation measure used by the central bank. First-quarter CPI is due for release next week.

“Despite food price inflation remaining subdued, inflation indicators point to a pick-up in other inflation areas,” Christina Leung, economist at ASB Bank, said in a note. “Overall, the result is in line with our expectations, and we expect the first quarter CPI released next Wednesday will show a 0.6 percent increase.”

Today’s figures showed meat, poultry and fish prices rose 0.9 percent in March, the biggest increase across the subgroups. Meat, poultry and fish prices rose 1.6 percent, with mutton, lamb and hogget prices up 15 percent in the year.

Restaurant meals and ready-to-eat food prices rose 0.4 percent in March, and were up 1.9 percent in the year, driving the annual gain.

Prices of non-alcoholic beverages increased 0.2 percent in the month for annual increase of 2.7 percent. Non-alcoholic beverages led the annual increase, with packaged coffee and tea prices climbing 5.3 percent.

Fruit and vegetable prices rose 0.5 percent in March, with cheaper apples and kumara. On an annual produce prices rose 1.5 percent with more expensive tomatoes, oranges and mandarins.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Price Of Cheese: Dairy Product Prices Fall To The Lowest This Year

Dairy product prices fell in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, hitting the lowest level in the 2015 auctions so far, as prices for milk powder and butter slid amid concern about the outlook for commodities. More>>

ALSO:

Houston, We Have An Air Route: Air New Zealand To Fly Direct To The Heart Of Texas

Air New Zealand will fly its completely refitted Boeing 777-200 aircraft between Auckland and Houston up to five times a week opening up the state of Texas as well as popular nearby tourist states such as Louisiana and Florida. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Reserve Bank’s Spencer Calls On Govt To Rethink Housing Tax

The Reserve Bank has urged the government to take another look at a capital gains tax on investment in housing, allow increased high-density development and cut red tape for planning consents to address an over-heated Auckland property market. More>>

ALSO:

The Nation: Call For Cross-Party Auckland Housing Plan

Penny Hulse calls for cross-party accord on Auckland housing because “it’s too important to score political points on”. More>>

ALSO:

Flu Season: Overcoming Vaccination Reluctance

While research shows that 40% of New Zealand businesses offer free or subsidised flu vaccinations to employees this time of year, HR professionals say persuading staff to participate is the biggest challenge. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news