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Tech-Savvy Gen-Y Top Investment for Kiwi Businesses

Tech-Savvy Gen-Y Top Investment for Kiwi Businesses

By Fleur Revell
14 April 2014


A leading business executive says investing in tech-savvy Gen-Y employees is the way forward in today’s market, and that Kiwi companies should resist giving them a bad rap.

The general manager for Domino’s New Zealand, Scott Bush, says today’s youths are often criticised for their constant use of digital devices.

However, the close connection that Gen-Y shares with the digital space makes them valuable employees, he says.

“The ceaseless interaction of NZ’s youth with their portable online devices means they are constantly consuming information, increasing their offering to a company on a macro level,” he says.

“Gen-Y are more worldly than the generations before them because of their ability and opportunity to access the digital world, and businesses need to tap into this and make the most of its relevance in today’s market.”

Bush says the digital space is becoming increasingly important for businesses to engage with their growing tech-savvy consumers.

While 60% of Domino’s sales are now processed online, Bush predicts this will rise to 80% within the next three years.
Bush says up to 90% of the company’s staff in NZ are from the Gen-Y age group.

By employing Gen-Y staff, companies can arm themselves with a better insight into the needs of consumers who use digital platforms, he says.

“The key is for companies to employ those who understand how to communicate with customers through this channel, and make a return on their affiliation with this forum,” he says.

Bush says that Domino’s gives new employees the option to do their training online, to help them better communicate with their young staff.

He says that Gen-Y offer not only digital expertise, but also malleability in an ever-changing world.

“The next generation are a flexible group who are constantly getting used to new devices. With good mentoring and support they can be invaluable to a business,” he says.

Bush says he expects the Quick Service Restaurants (QSR) industry will become increasingly technologically advanced over time.

Food deliveries will likely be able to be tracked street by street, similar to a GPS, in the coming years, he says.

“Our ongoing aim as a company is to continue to innovate so we can give customers as much control of their experience as possible,” he says.

“We’d like to see Domino’s in New Zealand become the largest digital retailer in the country as it is currently in Australia,” says Bush.

Other changes the food industry will likely see is an internationally-influenced better quality offering of ingredients from QSRs, he says.

“An international food industry trend which is already infiltrating into the Kiwi market is to deliver high quality foods, like our lava cakes and now white chocolate panna cotta, to the masses for a great value price,” says Bush.

“Ingredients that once seemed exclusive to restaurants are now being offered to consumers through QSRs for a low cost.”

For more information or to order Domino’s through the new online order site visit http://www.dominospizza.co.nz on your online device.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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