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Original Canterbury pioneers’ cottage up for sale

Original Canterbury pioneers’ cottage up for sale

One of Canterbury’s first pioneer residences, Tod Cottage, is on the market for sale

One of Canterbury’s most historic pioneer cottages - built by the first school teachers in the settlement of Lincoln - has been placed on the market for sale.

The quaint four bedroom home, listed in historical documents as Tod Cottage, was believed to have been built in the late 1870s by Scottish-born pioneer settlers William and Mary Tod who had immigrated to New Zealand from their native Scotland a decade earlier.

The Tod’s originally owned 200 acres of farmland on the eastern outskirts of Lincoln but over the years, sold down their landholding to concentrate on social-improvement activities in the The first of their philanthropic ventures was establishing Lincoln’s first school – which operated from their home. Presbyterian church services were also held at the residence.

Community-spirited William and Mary Tod also paid for, and assisted with the building of, Lincoln’s first library, which later went on to become the town’s Pioneer Hall.

Notes from Canterbury historical documents describe the Tod homestead as: “With its large sash windows and concave-roofed verandah, the house is similar in style to other early Lincoln dwellings. This, together with the observation that it appears to have been built to face the street, suggests that it dates from after the laying-out of the township – perhaps about 1875 – 1880.”

The 120sqm home sits on 875sqm of landscaped, fenced grounds land just a short walk from the centre of what is now the bustling Lincoln township with its schools and kindergarten.

The property is being marketed for sale by Bayleys Canterbury residential sales consultant Urszula Bedggood, who said there few surviving houses as old as Tod Cottage remaining in the town.

“As Canterbury prospered through its sheep farming activities in the early part of the 20th century, many of the older homes were either bowled over or left to deteriorate as newer dwellings were built,” she said.

“That Tod Cottage now remains as one of the few remnants of the early colonial settlement era is testament to the quality of workmanship and enduring materials used in its construction.

It’s like that old cliché…. ‘they just don’t build ‘em like that any more’.

“The construction techniques of 100-plus years ago, and the fact that the building is predominantly made of wood and sits on wooden piles, means the structure survived the earthquakes virtually unscathed – with only minimal cosmetic EQC repair work having already been done.”

Ms Bedggood said there had been considerable interior modifications to Tod Cottage to turn it into its current modern layout with extensive insulation and partial double glazing just to mention a few of the features that have been added to make it into a warm and comfortable home while still retaining the early character of the dwelling.

“The property also now has a modern garage with workshop and is tastefully landscaped to provide functionality, style with minimal maintenance,” she said.

“With all the various ‘modernisations’ which Tod Cottage has experienced over some 144 years, it still very much has a pioneer cottage feel to it and stands out from the surrounding neighbourhood.”

Ms Bedggood expected that any potential buyer for the cottage would be someone who appreciated the historic nature of the property, but with the mod con’s of contemporary home construction.

“It’s a romantic, historic home that has a warm and inviting feel - but due to an expanding family the vendors are regrettably having to leave this much loved family home,” she said.

“With Saturday and Sunday open homes from 3-3.30pm on both days, we invite people to come and have a look at this property which is for sale.”
ends

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