Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Awareness needed around psychology of hunting accidents

Hunter Safety Lab

HSL - “Awareness needed around psychology of hunting accidents”

April 15, 2014

Wellington start-up, Hunter Safety Lab says there needs to be greater awareness around the subconscious psychological factors that can cause safety conscious, experienced hunters to mistakenly shoot another hunter.

The comment came in light of the death of a Southland hunter shot by another hunter over the weekend.

It is the hunting season’s second shooting accident to take place in the space of two weeks since it officially kicked off at the beginning of April.

At the beginning of the month a Bay of Plenty man was seriously injured after being mistakenly shot by his father during a deer-hunting trip.

Michael Scott, co-founder of Hunter Safety Lab said that, sadly, these accidents occur nearly every hunting season.

Contrary to popular belief, they often involved an experienced, responsible hunter who knows and follows hunting rules, yet still made a tragic mistake.

Mr. Scott said hunters were encouraged to follow the “Seven Rules of Safe Hunting” (see below) by the Mountain Safety Council and the police, but these did not take into account human factors such as inattentional blindness, scenario fulfillment and tricks of the brain under particular conditions.

“Training and hunter education is absolutely essential for all hunters, however there needs to be a lot more awareness around other subconscious factors that can cause accidents and are not influenced or solved by training and education,” said Mr. Scott.

“It’s about the psychology of visual perception, and funnily enough, it is proven you are more susceptive to it the longer you have been hunting because what you see is subconsciously based on previous hunting experiences.

“99.9% of the time this subconscious processing of visual information is beneficial and enables us to function as humans, but occasionally it results in serious mistakes.

When these mistakes involve a high-powered hunting rifle, the consequences can be deadly.

“Because training and education mainly affects conscious voluntary behaviours, these types of hunting accidents are difficult to prevent.

“So hunter education groups, clubs and governance bodies need to bring this to the forefront so that hunters are taking this into consideration as well,” said Mr. Scott.

To address this, Hunter Safety Lab has created IRIS, a globally unique, active alert technology for hunters, which gives the shooter a warning if the target is wearing Hunter Safety Lab’s safety gear.

Hunter Safety Lab’s mission statement is to eliminate hunting accidents and the heartache caused by them.

“IRIS is not a replacement for hunter education, personal responsibility or the need to follow the basic rules, but it can give a last second warning if a mistake has been made, potentially saving someone’s life,” said Mr. Scott.

Product designers, fathers and hunters themselves, Mr. Scott and co-founder David Grove came up for the idea of IRIS when they were separated in the bush on their own hunting trip.

www.huntersafetylab.com.

The Mountain Safety Council’s 7 Rules of Hunter Safety 1.

Treat every firearm as loaded 2.

Always point firearms in a safe direction 3.

Load a firearm only when ready to fire 4.

Identify your target beyond all doubt 5.

Check your firing zone 6.

Store firearms and ammunition safely 7.

Avoid alcohol and drugs when handling firearms

Key Hunter Safety Statistics

The average hunting accident distance is about 35 meters.

A hunter is accidentally killed every nine months in NZ on average.

Two-thirds of hunting accident victims are shot by their companion.

The shooter is frequently an experienced, responsible hunter.

In the USA around half of victims are wearing high vis ‘blaze’ orange when shot.


© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news