Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Crowd Funding, Small Offers and the Takeovers Code

Crowd Funding, Small Offers and the Takeovers Code

Phase 1 of the Financial Markets Conduct Act 2013 (the “FMC Act”) came into effect on 1 April 2014.

The FMC Act introduces a number of new exclusions from disclosure for offers of financial products. Some exclusions, such as for crowd funding through licensed intermediaries and for “small offers”, are aimed at making it easier for small and medium sized companies to raise capital.

“Companies taking advantage of the exclusions from disclosure under the FMC Act to raise capital need to be aware that they could become, or may already be, subject to the Takeovers Code and to other regulatory regimes in doing so”, the Chairman of the Takeovers Panel, Mr David Jones, said today.

A company becomes subject to the Takeovers Code as soon as it has 50 or more shareholders (holding voting shares) and 50 or more share parcels. The Panel is not averse to companies deciding to structure their holdings so that they do not fall under the definition of “Code company”, provided that the structuring is undertaken in a manner that complies with the Takeovers Code (see paragraph 25 of the Panel’s Guidance Note for Small Code Companies).

“Issuers of securities under the FMC Act may wish to seek advice from a lawyer experienced in takeovers and corporate structuring if they are in doubt as to how the Takeovers Code might impact on them” said Mr Jones.

Licensed intermediaries offering crowd funding services can help by encouraging issuers to take specific legal advice on this point.
ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news