Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


KiwiSaver tax rates need fixing, world’s ‘most punitive’

KiwiSaver tax rates need fixing, world’s ‘most punitive’, says savings lobby

April 17 (BusinessDesk) – New Zealand’s tax system heavily penalises KiwiSaver while offering massive tax breaks to property investors and needs to change, says savings lobbyist the Financial Services Council.

Its executive director, Peter Neilson, issued a plea to political parties on the issue, which sees New Zealanders relying on retirement savings to save nearly twice as much per week as necessary to secure a comfortable retirement.

“At a practical level this means a person on an average income would have to save $16 a day rather than $27 (63% less) to achieve a comfortable retirement income,” said Neilson, a former Revenue Minister in the David Lange Labour government of 1984-90.

“For a typical person saving for retirement, just 10 percent of their retirement earnings comes from the initial contributions and a massive 90 percent from compound returns,” said Neilson.

Yet the way compound earnings are taxed at the moment means a person paying the top personal tax rate of 33 cents in the dollar can expect to lose more than half (54.7 percent) of their KiwiSaver retirement income, “due to the impact of taxation over 40 years.”

“New Zealand now has the world’s most punitive tax regime for retirement savings when compared with investments in rental housing,” he said. “If the same person invested in rental property their effective tax rate would be only 7.9 percent” if the property was based on a 20 percent deposit.

“If that period of ownership dropped down to only 10 years the rental investor would receive a tax credit, a payment from the IRD – effectively a subsidy for investing in rental property. We can’t all be rental property investors,” Neilson said.

The FSC proposes cutting the current KiwiSaver fund tax percentage rates of 28, 17.5 and 10.5 to 15, 8 and 4.3 respectively.

Paying for this would require sacrificing the $630 million annual cost of the $521 that KiwiSaver members can claim against their tax each year, but the $1000 tax-free KiwiSaver join-up incentive could be kept, said Neilson.

“Regardless of whether KiwiSaver is universal (compulsory) or voluntary, the over-taxation of KiwiSaver funds has to be addressed,” Mr Neilson says. “Leaders of all parties should say if they support or oppose introducing fair taxes on savings. Fairer taxes will have a huge impact on the future incomes of New Zealanders when they retire.”

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Revenue Renewal: Tax Modernisation Programme Launched

Revenue Minister Todd McClay today released the first two in a series of public consultations designed to modernise and simplify the tax system. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business:
NZ Puts Seven New Oil And Gas Areas Put Up For Tender

A total of seven new areas will be opened up to oil and gas exploration under its block offer tendering system, as the New Zealand government seeks to concentrate activity in a few strategically chosen areas. More>>

ALSO:

Half Full: Dairy Payouts Steady, Cash Will Be Tight

Industry body DairyNZ is advising farmers to focus on strong cashflow management as they look ahead to the 2015-16 season following Fonterra's half-year results announcement today. More>>

ALSO:

First Union: Cotton On Plans To Use “Tea Break” Law

“The Prime Minister reassured New Zealanders that ‘post the passing of this law, will you all of a sudden find thousands of workers who are denied having a tea break? The answer is absolutely not’... Cotton On is proposing to remove tea and meal breaks for workers in its safety sensitive distribution centre. How long before other major chains try and follow suit?” More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news