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Anthony Healy appointed to lead Bank of New Zealand

Anthony Healy appointed to lead Bank of New Zealand


BNZ chairman John Waller announced today that Anthony Healy had been appointed managing director and chief executive officer of BNZ, effective from 12 May, 2014.

This appointment is subject to formal clearance from the regulator.

“The board and I are very pleased that Anthony has accepted the offer of leading BNZ,” said Mr Waller.

“In his four-and-a-half years as director of BNZ Partners Anthony has demonstrated the commercial leadership, vision and character required to step up and lead the company, building on a long and successful career in business and commercial banking around the world.

“We congratulate Anthony on his appointment and wish him every success leading a company whose commitment to the prosperity of New Zealand is longstanding.

“The BNZ board has a strong focus on succession and leadership planning, drawing on the quality of the senior people we already have working with us. The quick selection of Andrew Thorburn’s successor is testament to that process, and gives BNZ’s people clarity and certainty.

Mr Waller said that BNZ Partners had gone from strength to strength under Mr Healy’s stewardship, with BNZ enjoying sustained success in agriculture and business markets.

Mr Waller said Anthony Healy’s contribution to BNZ has extended far beyond the purely commercial, as shown by his leadership of the bank’s diversity programme.

Mr Healy said he was thrilled to have been appointed to lead BNZ.

“The time is right for me to step into this role and help BNZ to build on the core strengths it has developed over the past five-and-a-half years under Andrew Thorburn’s leadership.

“Building on BNZ’s long and proud tradition of helping New Zealanders to be good with money, a core part of our strategy is to focus on the segments that will matter profoundly to New Zealand’s future too.

“Our investment in digital capability and technology platforms will enable us to keep meeting our customers’ needs. Our commitment to Maori business is a strong one, and our Asia strategy will keep our customers connected with emerging opportunities in a region whose importance to New Zealand will become ever greater in this century.

“From my first day in my new job I will be devoting myself to building on these advantages, and helping BNZ to win in our chosen segments. I can’t wait to get started, and work closely with a great team of 5,500 people across New Zealand,” said Mr Healy.

A replacement for Mr Healy as director of BNZ Partners will be announced in due course.

Ends

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