Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Scope for greater use of business coaches in New Zealand

Scope for greater use of business coaches in New Zealand


New Zealand business owners and senior management are among the heaviest users of business coaches in the world but there is still scope for greater involvement, according to Pam Newlove, Chair of Grant Thornton New Zealand Limited.

The latest Grant Thornton International Business Report survey of 45 countries has ranked New Zealand in sixth position, with 56% of those surveyed reporting they have used a business coach. A further breakdown revealed that 34% were currently using a coach and 22% had in the past.

“It can be pretty lonely running a business and a business coach provides an opportunity to talk with someone from outside the business in a non-threatening way,” said Newlove.

“They add value because they are impartial and it’s then up to the owner or senior management to consider the input from the coach and adopt or dismiss the advice they’ve been given. The recent recession is likely to have increased the need for coaching as well, as when tough decisions need to be made, the benefits of an external sounding board are even greater.”

The Philippines leads the world with 90% of business owners using or having used coaches followed by Taiwan (71%), Armenia (70%), Malaysia (66%), Botswana (62%) and Singapore alongside New Zealand on 56%.

“In many ways, New Zealand is trending towards the emerging economies in their use of coaches. As well as the countries above us in the survey, Chile, India, Russia and Brazil are also strong in the use of business coaches.

“Businesses in the emerging economies tend to have fewer regulations in some areas compared with those in mature economies like the United States, which gives business owners and coaches a greater opportunity to be innovative and different.

“New Zealand also has its own somewhat unique challenges in our isolation, reliance on primary industries and limited access to technology compared with advanced countries. Countering that is our ‘can do’ attitude and the ability to visualize the benefits of success.

“Our younger business owners tend to be pragmatic and are always looking to find a win-win solution, rather than trying to trump another company or person. Impartial coaches can have a positive impact on these situations as they do not have a personal agenda that can stymie a sensible outcome.”

Newlove said that coaching should not be confused with mentoring, which tends to have an internal focus and is undertaken by a senior staff member, who’s unlikely to have the same impartiality as an outsider. It can be easy for a mentor to slip into bullying behaviors because of their seniority, and other personal agendas that may be at play, such as role insecurities.

“A good coach will guide a business owner – not try to bully them.

“It’s worth investing time in finding a well suited, experienced coach, as just like in any sports team, a good coach is a game breaker,” she said.

- ends -

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Farming: Alliance Plans To Start Docking Farmer Payments

Alliance Group, New Zealand's second-largest meat cooperative, plans to start withholding some stock payments to its farmers from next week to bolster its balance sheet and force suppliers to meet their share requirements. More>>

ALSO:

Gambling: SkyCity First Half Profit Rises 30%, Helped By High Rollers

SkyCity anticipates the Auckland business will benefit from government gaming concessions which were triggered on Nov. 11 in recognition of SkyCity’s $470 million Convention Centre development. Morrison said the concessions would allow the Auckland business to lift its activity during peak period, noting it had a record revenue week over the Christmas and New Year period. More>>

ALSO:

Money For Light: Kiwi Scientists Secure Preferential Access To Synchrotron

Science and Innovation Minister Steven Joyce today announced a three-year investment of $2.8 million in the Australian Synchrotron, the largest piece of scientific infrastructure in the Southern Hemisphere, to secure preferential access for Kiwi scientists. More>>

Telco Industry Report: Investment Hits $1.7 Bln A Year

Investment in the telecommunications sector is $1.7 billion a year, proportionately one of the highest levels in the OECD, according to a report released today on the status of the New Zealand sector. More>>

ALSO:

PGPs: New Programme Sets Sights On Strong Wool

A new collaboration between The New Zealand Merino Company (NZM) and the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), announced today, aims to deliver premiums for New Zealand's strong wool sector... More>>

ALSO:

Restrictions Lifted: No Further Tau Flies Found

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) confirms that all restrictions on the movement of fruit and vegetables in Manurewa, Auckland, due to the Tau fly, have been lifted as of 2.26pm on Sunday 7 February. More>>

Crowdfinding: Awaroa Beach To Become Public Land If Appeal Succeeds

Conservation Minister Maggie Barry says a privately-owned beach will become part of the Abel Tasman National Park if an online crowdfunding campaign to buy it succeeds... More>>

ALSO:

Meat Workers Union: Waitangi Mondayisation Flaunted By Large Employer Of Maori

At the AFFCO Talley owned meat plant in Rangiuru, the company has resorted to bullying and threats... saying they could be disciplined and their union sued for an unlawful strike if workers exercise their rights to a paid day off tomorrow. More>>

Earlier:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news