Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Workers to strike at Lyttelton Port as pay negotiations fail

Workers to strike at Lyttelton Port as pay negotiations fail

By Suze Metherell

April 28 (BusinessDesk) – Workers at Christchurch’s ocean port plan to strike after pay negotiations between Lyttelton Port Co and the Rail and Maritime Transport Union fail.

The logistic officers, who are responsible for planning the movement of freight and cargo across the wharves, will strike from Friday between 11 pm to 7 am Saturday morning, the RMTU said in a statement. The 11 workers are seeking a 4 percent increase in pay over the next 12 months, above the 2.85 percent offered by management.

“The sticking point in the talks is pay, although ironically money doesn’t seem to be the issue as it would cost LPC only around $10,000 to settle this dispute,” said John Kerr, RMTU South Island organiser. The members have been negotiating since before Christmas, he said.

RMTU said port management didn’t want to set a precedent for negotiations for a wider collective agreement which covers over 400 port workers. Lyttelton Port wasn’t immediately available for comment.

In February the port resumed dividend payments for the first since they were suspended in 2010 following damage sustained in the Canterbury earthquakes. The company had a $438.3 million settlement with Vero, NZI and QBE, of which it recognised $357.6 million in insurance income in the six months ended Dec. 31, 2013.

Shares were unchanged at $3.19 on the NZX and have gained 39 percent in the past year. The stock is tightly held with Christchurch City Holdings, the investment arm of the council, owning about 80 percent of the company, while Port Otago holds another 15 percent.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Taxing Multinationals: EU Ruling Sours Apple

Shares of Apple slid, down 0.9 percent as of 3.08pm in New York, after the European Commission ruled that Ireland granted the company undue tax benefits of up to 13 billion euros (US$14.5 billion)—"illegal aid” under EU rules that the commission says Ireland now must recover from Apple. More>>

ALSO:

NZX Review: Best Practice Code Recommends Code Of Ethics

NZX, the sharemarket operator, is seeking feedback on proposed changes to its corporate governance best practice code including a published code of ethics, rules about share trading and continuous disclosure, and more transparency over board appointments and chief executive pay. More>>

ALSO:

Auditors:

Signs Of Life? SETI On Russian Space(?) Signal

A star system 94 light-years away is in the spotlight as a possible candidate for intelligent inhabitants, thanks to the discovery of a radio signal by a group of Russian astronomers... Could it be a transmission from a technically proficient society? At this point, we can only consider what is known so far. More>>

Post-Post: Brian Roche To Step Down As NZ Post CEO

Brian Roche will step down as chief executive of New Zealand Post in April 2017, having led the state-owned postal service's drive to adjust to shrinking mail volumes with a combination of cost cuts, asset sales, modernisation and expansion of new businesses. More>>

ALSO:

Company Results: Air NZ Rides The Tourism Boom With Record Full-Year Earnings

Air New Zealand has ridden the tourism boom and staved off increased competition to deliver the best full-year earnings in its 76-year history. More>>

ALSO:

New PGP: Sheep Milk Industry Gets $12.6M Crown Funding

The Sheep - Horizon Three programme aims to develop "a market driven, end-to-end value chain generating annual revenues of between $200 million and $700 million by 2030," according to a joint statement. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news