Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search


Food Labelling Under Scrutiny by International Academics

Media Release 28 April 2014

Kiwi Food Labelling Under Scrutiny by International Academics

New Zealander's attitudes towards Country of Origin Labelling (CoOL) on food products are to be studied by academics around the world after the inclusion of local research in a new university text book.

The textbook published by Cambridge University Press has been distributed throughout academic institutions in many of New Zealand's key trading partners including China, USA, Australia, Canada and Latin America.

The 242 page book Dynamics of International Business: Asia- Pacific Business Cases, edited by Prem Ramburuth, Christina Stringer, and Manuel Serapio, has also been distributed in Colombia, Indonesia, Hong Kong, and Thailand.

Dr Stringer a senior lecturer at The University of Auckland says the book has received positive reviews including a recent critique in the Academy of Management Learning and Education (AMLE) journal. The AMLE is ranked among the top five most influential and frequently cited management and educational research journals.

The AMLE review singled out the study – ‘Country of Origin Labelling and the New Zealand Seafood Industry (Stringer, Simmons, Rees) – for capturing the complexities of the New Zealand business landscape, including changing consumer tastes and attitudes towards country of origin labelling.

The food labelling research utilised in the case study was commissioned by Impact PR's Managing Director Fleur Revell whose marketing agency has a specialised interest in the fast moving consumer goods (FMCG) industry.

Fleur Revell says the Impact PR Food Labelling Study* found that most (58%) New Zealanders were confused by food labels and more than half (53%) felt that more information is needed on food labels, particularly country of origin and manufacturer details with four out of ten (42%) stating this preference.

Revell says country of origin was more important to older people, particularly those aged 45 and above, and health benefits more so for younger consumers, i.e. under 35.

"The fact that New Zealand's Country of Origin Labelling position is finding an international spotlight demonstrates there is an opportunity for us to become world leaders in improving communication between manufacturers and consumers. There is a significant amount of work to be done to provide a higher degree of transparency so that more informed decisions can be made at the point of purchase," says Revell.

"The payoff for New Zealand is not just a better educated local market but greater export opportunities as the learnings from this market improve our understanding of key markets globally."

Revell says New Zealand Government departments have also expressed interest in using the research findings to better understand consumers’ requirements in the modern age.

One of the authors of the study Glenn Simmons says country of origin labelling should be embraced by all businesses in order to project the very best of New Zealand into the homes of consumers globally.


Notes to Editors:

*For more details of the Impact PR Food Labelling study visit here:

© Scoop Media

Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines


Hourly Wage Gap Grows: Gender Pay Gap Still Fixed At Fourteen Percent

“The totally unchanged pay gap is a slap in the face for women, families and the economy,” says Coalition spokesperson, Angela McLeod. Even worse, Māori and Pacific women face an outrageous pay gap of 28% and 33% when compared with the pay packets of Pākehā men. More>>


Housing: English On Housing Affordability And The Economy

"Long lead times in the planning process tend to drive prices higher in the upswing of the housing cycle. And those lead times increase the risk that eight years later, when additional supply arrives, the demand shock that spurred the additional supply has reversed. The resulting excess supply could produce a price crash..." More>>


Sweet Health: Sugary Drinks Banned From Hospitals And Health Boards

All hospitals and DHBs are expected to kick sugary drinks out of their premises. University of Auckland researcher, Dr Gerhard Sundborn who also heads public health advocacy group “FIZZ”, says he welcomes the initiative. More>>


NASA: Evidence Of Liquid Water On Today's Mars

Using an imaging spectrometer on MRO, researchers detected signatures of hydrated minerals on slopes where mysterious streaks are seen on the Red Planet. These darkish streaks appear to ebb and flow over time. More>>


Bird Brains: Robins Can Just Be Generally Clever

Research from Victoria University of Wellington has revealed that birds may possess a ‘general intelligence’ similar to humans, with some individuals able to excel in multiple cognitive tests. More>>


Psa-V: Positive Result On Whangarei Kiwifruit Orchard

Kiwifruit Vine Health (KVH) has received a Psa-V positive test result on Hort16A and male vines on a kiwifruit orchard in Whangarei. This is the first confirmed case of Psa-V on an orchard in the Whangarei region. More>>

Regional Accents: Are Microbes The Key To Geographical Differences In Wine?

A new study of six of New Zealand’s major wine-growing regions has found that differences in flavour and aroma of wine from different areas may depend more on microbes than was previously thought. More>>


Science: AgResearch To Cut Science Staff In Areas Of 'Reduced Demand'

“We are therefore consulting with our staff from today on a proposal to reduce science staff in areas of shrinking demand. Combined with recruitment planned in areas of growing demand, this would mean a net reduction of 15 scientists and 41 technicians at AgResearch in the 2015/16 year." More>>


Get More From Scoop

Search Scoop  
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news