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Two new faces added to top team championing Kiwi innovation

Two new faces added to top team championing Kiwi innovation

Nationwide – April 29, 2014: James & Wells has added two new faces to its top team that champions Kiwi innovation, naming Tim Walden from Hamilton and Gus Hazel from Auckland as partners.

Foundation and managing partner of the firm, Ceri Wells, says the key appointments reflect the firm’s increasing dominance in New Zealand’s intellectual property (IP) services market.

“Of course we help people own and control their intellectual property, but it’s also about helping bring their ideas to life from start to finish, from business strategy to commercialisation,” he says.

Tim Walden is a lawyer and registered patent attorney who re-joined James & Wells on his return to New Zealand 11 years ago.

His wealth of overseas experience has given him first hand insight into the value of IP ownership for exporters in particular, including in the tricky area of trade mark enforcement overseas.

When Gus Hazel is not pursuing his passion for mountaineering, the patent attorney/lawyer is most likely to be in a courtroom using his expertise in litigation and other dispute resolution procedures to protect his client’s rights.

Gus, who has a Bachelor of Science and Graduate Diploma in Legal Practice in addition to his law degree, deals particularly with IP related litigation, including in the area of hazardous substances, agricultural chemicals and veterinary medicines.


He’ll not only be moving up in the world when he takes up his partnership, but to Newmarket as the James & Wells Auckland office shifted there on April 14.

Auckland-based James & Wells owner, Carrick Robinson, says Newmarket is better suited to the firm’s client base. “It’s also much more than simply an office space – it’s an environment that reflects our culture and who we are, which not only provides a great place for our people to work, but an inspiring place for clients to visit.”

Ends

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