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Reduced courtesy vehicle charges at Christchurch Airport

Reduced charges for courtesy vehicles at Christchurch Airport

Courtesy vehicle operators who collect customers from Christchurch Airport will soon pay less to do so.

Chief Commercial Officer Blair Forgie says reduced charges and new choices will take effect on July 1 and have today been communicated to accommodation providers and off-airport parking companies.

Mr Forgie says the changes are the result of a review of all ground transport operations at the airport.

“We have spent months reviewing charges for all operators, with the aim of ensuring equity and transparency across all ground transport,” he says. “We had to review taxi operations ahead of the expiry of current licences at the end of June, so widened the review out to include all ground transport operators.”

As a result, some charges will halve.

“From July 1, the access fee for courtesy vehicles will halve from $10.00 to $4.78 excluding GST. Alternatively, high users can choose to pay a fixed annual fee rather than the per-visit access fee. Both apply when collecting customers – dropping off stays free.”

Mr Forgie says on-demand taxis will also pay less.

“Taxis currently pay an annual licence fee of $5,000 and an access fee of $5 - $6 to collect their customers from the airport. From July 1 there will be no annual licence fee. Instead, taxi drivers will pay $4.78 excluding GST each time they drop off and collect customers, reflecting the fact that they charge customers for both trips.

“Importantly, from July 1 we will display taxi charges on signs at ground transport drop-off and collection points, as well as on the airport website, so customers will know exactly what the charges are.

“The new arrangement will help us encourage more taxis to be available here late at night when the final flights of the day arrive. Not having enough taxis around midnight has been a frustration for us and our travellers, so we anticipate better service in the future.”

Mr Forgie says customer research will result in changes to airport car parking in the next few months.

“For almost a year now, we have been asking customers what they want in terms of parking. They tell us choice is their top priority, followed by cost and convenience.

“The first thing we’re doing is making all the choices clear, both on and off the airport. This will include information on our website and a pamphlet issued across Canterbury to explain all the options available on and off the airport.

“We’re also working on ways to enhance what we already offer at the airport, including developing new parking areas and products.

“We’ll help the public understand all the options available to them when they’re coming to the airport, to make sure they choose the best area for their needs.”

Mr Forgie says the new parking choices will be announced in six to eight weeks.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
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