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Silent Leadership: New Zealand CEOs to Go Deaf for the Day

1 May 2014

Silent Leadership Challenge Returns in August
New Zealand CEOs to Go Deaf for the Day

After receiving such overwhelming nationwide support for 2013’s inaugural event, the Silent Leadership Challenge proudly returns on 1 August 2014.

Spearheaded by The National Foundation for the Deaf, the challenge requires participants to undergo three communication challenges in the workplace and one at home, wearing bright yellow hearing protectors to simulate deafness.

The National Foundation for the Deaf is calling upon all leaders, influencers and media to get on-board and participate on the day, with the aim of securing over 100 company CEOs to sign up and lead by example.

“Hearing impairment affects many New Zealanders, and by getting involved, CEOs will be showing they take the risk of noise injury seriously, and demonstrate a respect for the needs of hearing impaired staff and customers,” says The National Foundation for the Deaf CEO, Louise Carroll, who is also participating.

The challenges for 2014’s event:
• One-to-one meeting
• Team meeting
• Social get-together
• Watching TV at home

Ear protectors are happily provided by The Foundation as well as key information about the four challenges, fundraising tips, and everything else participants need to take part.

The goal? To increase nationwide awareness to the importance of noise-induced hearing loss prevention, and to raise funds for the Foundation’s work and support for those with hearing impairment or deafness.

2013’s inaugaral event raised over $50,000 and 2014 is already shaping up to surpass that total.

To take part, leaders need to register online at www.silentleadershipchallenge.com and should endeavour to raise funds by seeking sponsorship donations from people in their professional and social networks.

One in six New Zealanders have some type of hearing loss, which in turn robs them of the full ability to hear - a fundamental basic to participating in work, education, family and social activities.

By taking part in this great challenge, you join others in leading urgently-needed social change, help to change workplace attitudes to hearing loss prevention and increase workplace empathy for those who are deaf or hearing impaired.

“With the help and generosity of New Zealanders around the country, we can make a world of difference”.

ENDS

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