Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


World First: Beck’s Playable Posters

MEDIA RELEASE 1 MAY 2014
World First: Beck’s Playable Posters

In a technological coup, Beck’s New Zealand has today revealed the world’s first Playable Posters, which play music instantaneously when touched. Following the development of the world’s first playable beer bottle in 2013, Beck’s NZ is leading the world in the realm of music-inspired technology.

The Beck’s Playable Posters are made with conductive ink, which picks up electrical signals from fingers when activated parts of the poster are pressed (much like an iPad, except on paper). The conductive ink is linked to a speaker attached to the rear, which reverberates the poster and turns it into an 80 watt speaker.

The posters feature tracks Beck’s has commissioned from ten Kiwi artists to celebrate New Zealand Music Month in May. These tracks were heard for the first time through the posters, which launched today in Auckland.

Pete Dick from Beck’s NZ says: “Globally Beck’s has always been closely assimilated with music, art and fresh thinking and in New Zealand we’re leading the charge when it comes to cutting edge technology. The Playable Posters we’ve developed to promote New Zealand musicians are an exciting new medium for us, and provide a way to showcase some amazing local talent.”

Simon Curran, Managing Director at advertising agency Shine adds: “The traditional street poster has been around for over 200 years and it was time for a rethink. With the Beck’s Playable Posters, anyone can discover fantastic local talent, instantaneously, and in an unexpected setting. This technology is a genuine game changer for street posters and we’re proud to be the first in the world to harness its awesome potential. I expect we’ll start to see this technology used in a variety of applications.”

Beck’s Playable Posters will be up in Auckland, Wellington, Christchurch, Hamilton, Whangarei, Dunedin, Palmerston North and Napier throughout NZ Music Month. See www.facebook.com/BecksNZ for exact locations and more content.

How it works:
Conductive ink is printed onto the reverse of the graphic to create capacitive touch sensors, which pick up the electrical signals from our fingers.

The conductive ink is connected to an Apple II style processor to introduce iPad like touch to the piece of paper. A piezo electric speaker attached to the rear reverberates the board and turns it into an 80-Watt speaker.

There are 20 touch points and around 12 minutes of new music and audio.

Designed in Cambridge, UK by Novalia, the technology has never been used commercially before.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Court Ruling: Kiwifruit NZ Ordered To Consider Collaborative Marketing Proposals

The High Court has told kiwifruit marketer Zespri to reconsider collaborative marketing proposals from Splice Fruit and Seeka Kiwifruit to sell fruit offshore that its board had previously rejected. More>>

ALSO:

Electric Vehicles: No Road User Charges Feature In Govt Package

Drivers of electric vehicles won't have to pay road user charges and will be allowed to drive in bus lanes as part of a new government plan to double EV numbers annually to a target 64,000 by 2021. More>>

ALSO:

Pre-Budget: Computer Emergency Response Team, Assemble!

John Key told the country's first ever Cyber Security Summit in Auckland that the government had earmarked funding set up a national Computer Emergency Response Team to help prevent and act on cyber incidents in partnership with the private sector and other organisations. More>>

ALSO:

Job Cutter Goes: Mark Weldon To Step Down As MediaWorks CEO

“When I joined MediaWorks in August 2014, I had a mandate to lead a significant change programme to bring the business back from receivership into a position where it could once again be a strong competitor in the market, with a sound and sustainable future. It was a big brief, laden with inherent challenges, but I took it in good faith and have dedicated myself fully to the goal since." More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news