Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 

Robert Whale suspended for twelve months from legal practice

Robert Barry Whale suspended for twelve months from legal practice

The New Zealand Lawyers and Conveyancers Disciplinary Tribunal has suspended Robert Barry Whale from practice as a barrister and solicitor for a period of twelve months commencing from 20 March 2014.

Mr Whale was admitted as a barrister and solicitor in 1970 but does not currently hold a practising certificate, having not renewed his certificate as at June 2013.

The tribunal has also ordered Mr Whale to pay the costs of the New Zealand Law Society, which had charged him with having been convicted of an offence punishable by imprisonment with the conviction tending to bring his profession into disrepute.

Mr Whale admitted the charge.

The criminal convictions were Securities Act offences committed when he was a director of Dominion Holdings Finance Ltd and its subsidiaries Dominion Finance Group Ltd and North South Finance Ltd.

As a director of an issuer of securities Mr Whale was convicted of four offences for signing registered prospectuses that were distributed and which included untrue statements. As a director of an issuer of securities he was also convicted of three offences for distributing an advertisement that included untrue statements.

New Zealand Law Society President Chris Moore said the High Court found that Mr Whale’s conduct amounted to “gross negligence” and he had admitted that he had not read the prospectuses before signing them.

“Our securities laws are there to protect the public and to keep investors fully informed. The public is entitled to expect that members of the legal profession will perform to a high standard and ensure that protection is maintained,” he said.

Ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

By May 2018: Wider, Earlier Microbead Ban

The sale and manufacture of wash-off products containing plastic microbeads will be banned in New Zealand earlier than previously expected, Associate Environment Minister Scott Simpson announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Snail-ier Mail: NZ Post To Ditch FastPost

New Zealand Post customers will see a change to how they can send priority mail from 1 January 2018. The FastPost service will no longer be available from this date. More>>

ALSO:

Property Institute: English Backs Of Debt To Income Plan

Property Institute of New Zealand Chief Executive Ashley Church is applauding today’s decision, by Prime Minister Bill English, to take Debt-to-income ratios off the table as a tool available to the Reserve Bank. More>>

ALSO:

Divesting: NZ Super Fund Shifts Passive Equities To Low-Carbon

The NZ$35 billion NZ Super Fund’s NZ$14 billion global passive equity portfolio, 40% of the overall Fund, is now low-carbon, the Guardians of New Zealand Superannuation announced today. More>>

ALSO:

Split Decision - Appeal Planned: EPA Allows Taranaki Bight Seabed Mine

The Decision-making Committee, appointed by the Board of the Environmental Protection Authority to decide a marine consent application by Trans-Tasman Resources Ltd, has granted consent, subject to conditions, for the company to mine iron sands off the South Taranaki Bight. More>>

ALSO: