Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


The taste of terroir

The taste of terroir


As important for water as it is for wine

Where is your tap water from?


Oenophiles have long appreciated the importance of terroir in the creation of their favourite wines. The influence of climate, soil and topography imparts a unique, highly distinctive “sense of place” in grapes from different regions – even different parts of the same vineyard.

What many don’t realise is that terroir is just as important for the water that’s served alongside the wine. A water’s character will depend on the site of its source and the aquifer, the porous rock through which the water trickles.

In Auckland 80% of our tap water comes from dams in the Hunua and Waitakere Ranges. Pour yourself a glass and you may be able to detect a hint of volcanic basalt, alluvial native forests and pines, with perhaps a dash of earthy sedimentation from the Waikato River.

The knowledge that terroir influences the taste of water is far from a radical new idea. The ancient Romans were as discerning about water as they were about wine, judging the water from each of their aqueducts by transparency and taste. They also imported “bottled” water at vast expense. Travellers between Florence and Bologna would refresh themselves at the Acqua Panna spring, renowned for the delicate purity of its water.

Centuries later, that spring is the source of Acqua Panna mineral water. Originating in the peaks of the Apennine Mountains, water filters into the ground on Monte Gazzaro. After travelling for 10 to 15 years through the Tuscan hills, it comes to the surface at an altitude of 900 metres, in a natural reserve filled with ancient forests of beech and chestnut trees. During its journey, water from the source is filtered and purified as it flows through sandstone deposits, while bicarbonates, calcium and phosphates are gradually added in equal amounts.

This unique terroir is reflected in Acqua Panna’s perfectly balanced, limpid, light-bodied taste and smooth, velvety mouth feel.

S.Pellegrino is another special water displaying the characteristics of the region it comes from, with the source located deep in the Orobie Alps. In the Middle Ages, the water was renowned for promoting health and wellbeing. Today, S.Pellegrino water tastes just the same as it did centuries ago, and has become a symbol of all that is Italian. It flows in the artesian basin for about 30 years, with naturally occurring carbon dioxide added at the end of the cycle. The now sparkling water emerges at the spring in Val Brembana, in the foothills of the Alps.

S.Pellegrino water has lively and long-lived bubbles that feel creamy on the palate. The slightly salty taste is well-balanced with acidity, and the rich minerality delivers a refreshing, thirst-quenching feel. Significant amounts of naturally imbued magnesium make it an excellent table water.

With the unique characteristics of both mineral waters, Acqua Panna and S.Pellegrino protect their natural environments – and are committed to the sustainable use of each water resource. This ensures that their pristine purity is preserved.

Matching a water’s terroir to your personal taste:

Thanks to their unique organoleptic properties, specific mineral content and refined taste, Acqua Panna and S.Pellegrino enhance the enjoyment of good food and wine.

• Make sure the mineral water comes from a natural spring.

• Check the chemical properties on the label. Higher levels of calcium and bicarbonate can give water a softer, creamier mouth feel.

• Consider the menu. Neil Philips, UK ambassador for S.Pellegrino and Acqua Panna, recommends drinking S.Pellegrino with “big, full-flavoured dishes” such as beef or game, or strong cheese like Parmigiano-Reggiano. Acqua Panna’s gentler, non-carbonated qualities suit more elegant flavours such as oysters, creamy pasta, veal and light desserts.

• Select the right water for the wine it will be accompanying. The official water of the Association de la Sommellerie Internationale, Acqua Panna should be served with soft wine with moderate alcohol. High mineral sparkling waters such as S.Pellegrino complement spicy Syrahs and other full-bodied red wines.

For more information, please visit www.sanpellegrino.com and www.acquapanna.com.

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Real Estate: Housing Prices Head South In Most Of NZ

Housing became more affordable for first home buyers in many parts of the country including Auckland last month, as falling prices more than offset rising mortgage interest rates. More>>

ALSO:

Cosmetics & Pollution: Proposal To Ban Microbeads

Cosmetic products containing microbeads will be banned under a proposal announced by the Minister for the Environment today. Marine scientists have been advocating for a ban on the microplastics, which have been found to quickly enter waterways and harm marine life. More>>

ALSO:

NIWA: 2016 New Zealand’s Warmest Year On Record

Annual temperatures were above average (0.51°C to 1.20°C above the annual average) throughout the country, with very few locations observing near average temperatures (within 0.5°C of the annual average) or lower. The year 2016 was the warmest on record for New Zealand, based on NIWA’s seven-station series which begins in 1909. More>>

ALSO:

Farewell 2016: NZ Economy Flies Through 2016's Political Curveballs

Dec. 23 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy batted away some curly political curveballs of 2016 to end the year on a high note, with its twin planks of a booming construction sector and rampant tourism soon to be joined by a resurgent dairy industry. More>>

ALSO:

NZ Economy: More Growth Than Expected In 3rd Qtr

Dec. 22 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy grew at a faster pace than expected in the September quarter as a booming construction sector continued to underpin activity, spilling over into related building services, and was bolstered by tourism and transport ... More>>

  • NZ Govt - Solid growth for NZ despite fragile world economy
  • NZ Council of Trade Unions - Government needs to ensure economy raises living standards
  • KiwiRail Goes Deisel: Cans electric trains on partially electrified North Island trunkline

    Dec. 21 (BusinessDesk) – KiwiRail, the state-owned rail and freight operator, said a small fleet of electric trains on New Zealand’s North Island would be phased out over the next two years and replaced with diesel locomotives. More>>

  • KiwiRail - KiwiRail announces fleet decision on North Island line
  • Greens - Ditching electric trains massive step backwards
  • Labour - Bill English turns ‘Think Big’ into ‘Think Backwards’
  • First Union - Train drivers condemn KiwiRail’s return to “dirty diesel”
  • NZ First - KiwiRail Going Backwards for Xmas
  • Get More From Scoop

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Business
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news