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Three decades of Maori development to be recognised

Tuesday, May 6, 2014
Three decades of Maori development to be recognised by Massey University

Massey University is to play host to an important conference in September this year, thirty years after the first Māori economic summit.

The Māori Economic Summit Conference or Hui Taumata was convened in 1984. The conference gave impetus to a Māori-focused economy, and brought together Māori from across the country to discuss economic challenges and new directions for Maori development.

Māori business experts and academics who are highly regarded internationally will debate the challenges and opportunities ahead for New Zealand as a nation, and how Māori can balance economic, social, cultural and environmental dimensions for the current and future generations at the Te Pae Roa 2040 conference.

The agenda for Te Pae Roa 2040 will explore a range of future-focused issues including the relationship between Iwi development and whānau wellbeing, and the balance between economic, social, cultural and environmental management.

Assistant Vice-Chancellor (Māori, Pasifika and New Migrants) Dr Selwyn Katene says the conference is an important event for Māori.

“The conference will play a key part in shaping the focus for Māori as we move towards 2040 – the bi-centennial anniversary of the Treaty of Waitangi. Massey University is pleased to connect Māori to provide a platform to shape strategic pathways for the future.”

Emeritus Professor Sir Mason Durie agrees. “The challenges over the next three decades will be quite different from those over the previous thirty years. But the experiences and gains made since 1984 will provide strong foundations for charting a course relevant to the years ahead.”

The Te Pae Roa 2040 conference will be held at Massey University’s Albany campus from September 3 – 4. Over the two days a number of speakers will discuss where Māori want to be in the year 2040, with a focus on economic, social, cultural and environmental topics.

Since the inaugural conference in 1984, two anniversary conferences have continued the discussion. The first was held in 1994 and hosted by Massey, and again in 2005, hosted by Victoria University in conjunction with the Ministry of Māori Affairs.

For information on how to register to attend the conference visit http://www.tepaeroa2040.co.nz

ENDS


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