Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


MBIE’s dairy farm employee position statement positive

8 May 2014

MBIE’s dairy farm employee position statement positive

With the employment practices of dairy farmers in the media spotlight, the Ministry for Business, Innovation and Employment’s (MBIE) Labour Inspectorate’s newly released position statement, is to be followed up by both Federated Farmers and DairyNZ.

“Dairy farmers can expect a joint Industry Best Practice Guidance note next week,” says Katie Milne, Federated Farmers employment spokesperson.

“Both Federated Farmers and DairyNZ endorses MBIE’s common sense position statement, which not only reminds employers about the Minimum Wage Act 1983, but reminds them ‘seasonal averaging’ has gone the same way as 245-T.

“Bearing in mind many farm employers pay above the minimum wage for entry level roles, it reminds employers the law stipulates that every employee must be paid at least the minimum wage, for every hour they work.

“We genuinely applaud MBIE’s decision to review the Minimum Wage Order to include a fortnightly minimum wage rate in the order.

“Farm employees tell us they want to be paid consistent wages but the Minimum Wage Order’s current week-by-week focus is outdated. It does not reflect the modern rostered environment on today’s farms.

“What MBIE is doing will benefit many other industries outside of the primary industries.

“The Statement addresses the biggest concern I had with what MBIE recently found and that was widespread failure to properly record time and holidays. This makes any employer’s position indefensible and exposes farm businesses to fines of up to $20,000.

“As an overwhelming number of farm employees receive accommodation, the Statement says that accommodation costs can be treated as “wages” under the Minimum Wage Act.

“While employers and employees may agree that accommodation costs can be deducted before the payment of wages, accommodation costs should be clearly detailed and reasonable.

“Record keeping is vital and needs to be kept separate from the employment agreement, or is able to be separated.

“Given there are considerable benefits to working on-farm, from food to firewood, the statement clarifies that such benefits do not form part of the employee’s wages. Instead, if the employee agrees, it can be deducted from wages at an agreed cost.

“Both Federated Farmers and DairyNZ know our guys need to seriously lift their game because if you are deficient you will be done like a dog’s dinner.

“If you are a Federated Farmers member, our industry standard employment contract costs just $60 ($300 for non-members). While there’s GST on top, the contract includes comprehensive notes covering the minimum wage, holidays act and the like.

“On Monday, we released a more advanced Employers Pack providing all the information, requirements, forms and agreements that any first time employer needs in agriculture.

“In light of the Psychoactive Substances Amendment Bill, our employers pack contains a new drug and alcohol policy as well as an outline of the correct disciplinary process.

“For members of the Federation, this more detailed version costs a mere $120 with GST on top. A very small price to pay considering the penalties and bad press at stake.

“If farm employers are members of the Federation, they can further call 0800 327 646 (0800 FARMING) to access the Federation’s free employment law help line. If you are in doubt just call us,” Katie Milne concluded.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Cosmetics & Pollution: Proposal To Ban Microbeads

Cosmetic products containing microbeads will be banned under a proposal announced by the Minister for the Environment today. Marine scientists have been advocating for a ban on the microplastics, which have been found to quickly enter waterways and harm marine life. More>>

ALSO:

NIWA: 2016 New Zealand’s Warmest Year On Record

Annual temperatures were above average (0.51°C to 1.20°C above the annual average) throughout the country, with very few locations observing near average temperatures (within 0.5°C of the annual average) or lower. The year 2016 was the warmest on record for New Zealand, based on NIWA’s seven-station series which begins in 1909. More>>

ALSO:

Farewell 2016: NZ Economy Flies Through 2016's Political Curveballs

Dec. 23 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy batted away some curly political curveballs of 2016 to end the year on a high note, with its twin planks of a booming construction sector and rampant tourism soon to be joined by a resurgent dairy industry. More>>

ALSO:


NZ Economy: More Growth Than Expected In 3rd Qtr

Dec. 22 (BusinessDesk) - New Zealand's economy grew at a faster pace than expected in the September quarter as a booming construction sector continued to underpin activity, spilling over into related building services, and was bolstered by tourism and transport ... More>>

  • NZ Govt - Solid growth for NZ despite fragile world economy
  • NZ Council of Trade Unions - Government needs to ensure economy raises living standards
  • KiwiRail Goes Deisel: Cans electric trains on partially electrified North Island trunkline

    Dec. 21 (BusinessDesk) – KiwiRail, the state-owned rail and freight operator, said a small fleet of electric trains on New Zealand’s North Island would be phased out over the next two years and replaced with diesel locomotives. More>>

  • KiwiRail - KiwiRail announces fleet decision on North Island line
  • Greens - Ditching electric trains massive step backwards
  • Labour - Bill English turns ‘Think Big’ into ‘Think Backwards’
  • First Union - Train drivers condemn KiwiRail’s return to “dirty diesel”
  • NZ First - KiwiRail Going Backwards for Xmas
  • NIWA: The Year's Top Science Findings

    Since 1972 NIWA has operated a Clean Air Monitoring Station at Baring Head, near Wellington... In June, Baring Head’s carbon dioxide readings officially passed 400 parts per million (ppm), a level last reached more than three million years ago. More>>

    ALSO:

    Get More From Scoop

     
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
    Business
    Search Scoop  
     
     
    Powered by Vodafone
    NZ independent news