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Silver Fern Farms joins Secure Export Scheme

Silver Fern Farms joins Secure Export Scheme


Customs and Silver Fern Farms have signed a partnership under the NZ Customs Secure Export Scheme (SES), endorsing the exporter’s supply chain security standards.

Customs and Silver Fern Farms executives met at the Silver Fern Farms head office in Dunedin today to seal the deal with an official Certificate of Partnership.

Customs Comptroller Carolyn Tremain says New Zealand’s SES is a world-leading programme that meets global supply chain security standards, and aims to make the international trade of legitimate goods easier. The scheme ensures there is minimal intervention at export, and gives our overseas trade partners greater assurance of security.

“Customs is committed to supporting international trade and recognises the significance of the meat export industry to our economy. We’re extremely pleased to welcome New Zealand’s largest meat producer and exporter on board.

“This partnership shows our high level of confidence in the security of Silver Fern Farms’ supply chain, and they will be recognised as trusted traders in countries we share mutual recognition arrangements with – United States, Japan and the Republic of Korea.”

Silver Fern Farms Chief Operating Officer Kevin Winders says joining the partnership will bring efficiencies to the co-operative and surety to international customers.

“Joining the Secure Export Scheme is a good step for the business as it has refined processes through our chain of care which will make exporting easier. Working with Customs in this partnership means we can demonstrate to our international trading partners that we are committed to ensuring the integrity and security of the goods we provide them.”

Exporters that are approved for the SES provide Customs with risk management plans that assure their goods are packed and transported securely to the place of shipment without interference.

Containers are secured with a tamper-indicative Customs-approved seal to show they can be considered secure by other overseas customs administrations. Customs conducts audits to assure these standards are maintained.

The SES is voluntary and open to all exporters. More information is available on Customs website: www.customs.govt.nz/features/ses


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