Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


NZ venison breaks with tradition in Holland

14 May 2014

NZ venison breaks with tradition in Holland

A Dutch company aims to make New Zealand farmed venison a year-round menu item on a continent where tradition dictates how and when game meats may be eaten.

Hanos, the largest food service distributor in the Netherlands, has begun a two-month promotion that aims to separate NZ venison from those traditions. At the direction of Ben Veldcamp, the company's head game buyer, New Zealand venison has been renamed and presented in new barbecue-ready cuts.

Instead of being called hertenvlees – a name chefs associate with wild venison – the meat is being called Boerderijhert uit Nieuw-Zeeland, Dutch for Farmed deer from New Zealand. The cuts themselves have been given names that echo those of American beef grilling cuts.

"We're giving Hanos promotional support and exporters are working with the company to assure them of year-round supply. Our executive chef Graham Brown will be in the Netherlands shortly to do chef demonstrations," says Deer Industry New Zealand (DINZ) chief executive Dan Coup.

DINZ and exporters also hosted Mr Veldcamp in New Zealand in March, to give him a better understanding of the industry.

For several years the industry has strived to get NZ venison recognised in Europe as a year-round menu item, ideal for barbecues, stir fries and other modern meal presentations.

Gerard Hickey, director of Firstlight Venison, says encouraging discussions had been held with Hanos over a number of years. But the trigger was disruption to the supply of ostrich and antelope from South Africa because of exotic disease outbreaks.

"These meats were popular in the year-round fast-grill lean meat market - the very niche that NZ venison wants to be in."

In the early days of the deer industry New Zealand found a ready-made European market for venison in the game season. Hickey says this has proved to be both a blessing and a curse.

"The traditional market pays excellent prices in the short autumn game season, but for the rest of the year it is not really interested in supply. Also the game meat tradition is associated with slow-cooking styles and rich sauces more suited to wild-shot game than our tender, mild-favoured, product.

"When the suppliers of ostrich and antelope came to the market, they had the opposite experience. There was a demand for a lean non-traditional grilling meat and because their products were completely novel they filled that void."

Mr Coup says the European game meat market has become much more competitive in the last few years. Increased supply and improved quality from European competitors makes it harder for New Zealand to maintain its price premium, when most buyers are looking for product that is destined for slow cooking in a goulash.

"DINZ and exporters are putting a lot of effort into developing market niches that will reward our deer farmers year-round for the quality of their product. To have a major customer who shares our vision is a huge plus, so we are backing him enthusiastically."

Mr Coup says Silver Fern Farms as well as Firstlight Foods supply Hanos. Other exporters are also being encouraged by Hanos to supply their Dutch customers with similar cuts in order to build a critical mass of demand.

"Fingers crossed. If this proves to be a game-changer in Holland, it will make it easier for us to convince our customers elsewhere in Europe to embrace a similar strategy."

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Housing Policy: Auckland Densification As Popular As Ebola, English Says

Finance Minister Bill English said calls by the Reserve Bank Governor for more densification in Auckland’s housing were “about as popular in parts of Auckland as Ebola” would be. More>>

ALSO:

Crown Accounts: NZ Government Deficit Smaller Than Expected In First Half

The New Zealand government's operating deficit was smaller than expected in the first six months of the financial year, as the consumption and corporate tax take rose ahead of forecast in December, having lagged estimates in previous months. More>>

ALSO:

Fruit & Veg Crackdown: Auckland Fruit Fly Find Under Investigation

The Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI) is investigating a find of a single male Queensland fruit fly in a surveillance trap in the Auckland suburb of Grey Lynn... MPI has placed legal controls on the movement of fruit and some vegetables outside of a defined circular area which extends 1.5km from where the fly was trapped in Grey Lynn. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Westpac NZ Reaches $2.97M Swaps Settlement

Westpac Banking Corp’s New Zealand unit has agreed to pay $2.97 million in a settlement with the Commerce Commission over the way the bank sold interest rate swaps to farmers between 2005 and 2012. More>>

ALSO:

Going Dutch: Fonterra Kicks Off $144M Partnership With Dutch Cheese Maker

Fonterra Co-operative Group, the world’s largest dairy exporter, has commissioned a new dairy ingredients plant in Heerenveen, in the north of the Netherlands, its first wholly-owned and operated ingredients plant in Europe. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: NZ Retail Sales Beat Estimates

New Zealand retail sales rose more than expected in the fourth quarter, led by vehicle-related transactions, food and beverages, adding to evidence that cheap credit and a growing jobs market are encouraging consumers to spend. More>>

ALSO:

Delivery Cuts Go Ahead: 'Government Money Grab' From NZ Post

"It's a money grab by the Government as the shareholder of New Zealand Post" says Postal Workers Union advocate Graeme Clarke about the changes announced by NZ Post. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news