Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Budget Predominantly Positive

Budget Predominantly Positive


Property Council applauds the Government’s 2014 Budget for the provisions it makes in several areas in a forward momentum which will benefit the whole nation.


The Budget has announced a commitment to increasing housing supply which directly targets the country’s housing unaffordability crisis. Increasing supply is key to assisting with housing affordability, as well as providing more options to prospective buyers.


The development of Housing Accords to fast track supply in key areas of New Zealand, which are experiencing high levels of demand, illustrates the importance of this matter.


Measures over the next year must include releasing land for development, agglomeration of sites to enable a big enough footprint for dense development, the provision of relevant infrastructure, master planning and streamlined efficient consent processes.


The Government’s steps to accelerate infrastructure in Auckland, such as roading and rail, is particularly positive in this regard as is the Government’s work to ensure lower construction costs, more equitable development contributions and efficient Resource Management Act processes.


However, the Budget leaves a gaping hole in the area of seismic strengthening and fails to address costs and affordability issues associated with undertaking strengthening work.


At the moment, too much time is passing with ever increasing uncertainty about how to remedy the detrimental impacts of this on local communities. Costs for undertaking strengthening work are substantial and it is likely many building owners will struggle to afford them. The Government’s intervention in this area is paramount.


Property Council chief executive Connal Townsend strongly supports the priority given to the Christchurch rebuild and the desire to get development and investment into the city.


“The announcement of apprentice schemes is particularly positive, especially in respect of the priority trades we need for the Christchurch rebuild, and construction in Auckland.


“However we urge the Government to engage the Private Sector in processes and decision making, to ensure efficiencies and effecting integration of private and public sector requirements. Speedy, effective decisions are key.”


END.

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Floods: Initial Assessment Of Economic Impact

Authorities around the region have compiled an initial impact assessment for the Ministry of Civil Defence, putting the estimated cost of flood recovery at around $120 million... this early estimate includes social, built, and economic costs to business, but doesn’t include costs to the rural sector. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news