Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Offshore ironsands miner confident of consent

Offshore ironsands miner confident of consent

May 19 (BusinessDesk) – A company seeking permission to mine ironsands off the coast of Patea in New Zealand’s Exclusive Economic Zone says it is “confident” the project “can proceed.”

The statement from Trans-Tasman Resources follows today’s formal closing of the marine consent hearings by the Decision-Making Committee appointed by the Environmental Protection Authority to consider the application.

The DMC unexpectedly adjourned rather than closed the hearings on the last day of submissions, 10 days ago, while it considered whether it had all the information it required.

The last week of hearings were marked by the publication of a report from EPA staff that raised serious concerns about whether there was sufficient information available to draft effective regulations to reduce the environmental impacts of the project.

TTR chief executive Tim Crossley said: “While it is easy for submitters and technical experts to identify further work that could be done, there is also a limit to how much information can realistically be expected of an applicant before consent is granted.

“Based on the independent expert evidence and the joint witness statements, we continue to be confident that the local and national benefits of our project substantially outweigh the perceived adverse effects.”

The proposal is for mining some 22 to 36 kilometres offshore in the southern Taranaki bight, in water depths of between 20 and 45 metres. The company would dredge around 50 million tonnes of sand from the seafloor annually to a depth of about five metres, from which it would extract around five million tonnes of iron ore for export to Asian steel mills.

A similar onshore operation has been operating at Taharoa, on the west coast south of Auckland, for three decades.

Unused sand would be returned to the seafloor, with worm-fields and other aquatic life on the seafloor recovering to its original state within a decade.

Opposition to the proposal focused on concerns about the impact of sediment plumes on marine life, potential impacts on migratory species such as blue whales and Maui’s dolphin, and the potential to have an impact on wave action.

The application is the first under a new regime regulating economic development in the EEZ. A proposal to mine phosphate nodules on the Chatham Rise, to the east of the South Island, was lodged by Chatham Rock Phosphate last week.

A decision on the TTR application is due within 20 working days. The company, backed by US, Australian and New Zealand investors, was established in 2007 and has spent some $50 million to understand the resource, engineering requirements for mining and environmental issues.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

SOE Results: TVNZ Lifts Annual Profit 25% On Flat Ad Revenue, Quits Igloo

Television New Zealand, the state-owned broadcaster, lifted annual profit 25 percent, ahead of forecast and despite a dip in advertising revenue, while quitting its stake in the pay-TV Igloo joint venture with Sky Network Television. More>>

ALSO:

Insurers Up For More Payouts: Chch Property Investor Wins Policy Appeal In Supreme Court

Ridgecrest NZ, a property investor, has won an appeal in the Supreme Court over insurance cover provided by IAG New Zealand for a Christchurch building damaged in four successive earthquakes. More>>

ALSO:

Other Cases:

Royal Society: Review Finds Community Water Fluoridation Safe And Effective

A review of the scientific evidence for and against the efficacy and safety of fluoridation of public water supplies has found that the levels of fluoridation used in New Zealand create no health risks and provide protection against tooth decay. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Croxley Calls Time On NZ Production In Face Of Cheap Imports

Croxley Stationery, whose stationery brands include Olympic, Warwick and Collins, plans to cease manufacturing in New Zealand because it has struggled to compete with lower-cost imports in a market where the printed word is giving way to electronic communications. More>>

ALSO:

Prefu Roundup: Forecasts Revised, Surplus Intact

The National government heads into the election with its Budget surplus target broadly intact, delivering a set of economic and fiscal forecasts marginally revised from May to reflect weaker commodity prices and a lower tax take. More>>

ALSO:

Convention Centre: Major New SkyCity Hotel And Laneway For Auckland

Today SKYCITY Entertainment Group Limited revealed plans to build a new hotel and pedestrian laneway of bars, restaurants and boutique shopping on land it owns in the Nelson and Hobson Streets block, expanding the SKYCITY Entertainment Precinct. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Computer Power Plus

Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news