Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


Wellington looks to $125M waterfront convention centre

Wellington looks to $125M waterfront convention centre

By Pattrick Smellie

May 20 (BusinessDesk) – The Wellington City Council appears close to signing a heads of agreement with the Hilton hotel chain and local property developer Mark Dunajtschik for a $125 million convention centre on the waterfront opposite the national museum, Te Papa.

Mayor Celia Wade-Brown issued a statement yesterday evening saying the convention centre and five-star hotel project would involve “no capital investment or construction risk for the city”, although the council’s economic development committee chair, Jo Coughlan, told BusinessDesk the convention centre was likely to require a three-year council subsidy.

The Hilton would not commit to the hotel project without a convention centre being part of the deal and, subject to a business plan being satisfactorily finalised, would be willing to subsidise the centre’s operations in the initial stages.

“It doesn’t require any government funding and would be up and running by 2017,” said Coughlan. “That means it would be on board before potentially Christchurch, Auckland and Queenstown, so that mitigates the risk of the other three coming on stream.”

Wellington already holds the second largest number of conventions in the country, but its “niche” offering at present would be markedly expanded by the proposed development, on bare land once owned by Railways Corp. and sold into private ownership in the 1990’s. It has housed car yards and been a parking lot in recent years.

“The non-controversial location means resource consent is not required to be notified,” said Wade-Brown in a statement, which noted also that the development would not require a casino for its viability, unlike the Auckland convention centre, which is being developed by SkyCity Entertainment Group in a controversial deal with the government which will allow it additional gaming machines in return.

A full business case will be presented to the Wellington City Council in late June for final decisions.

Dunajtschik is a controversial local figure because of his recent opposition and court action to try and prevent being forced to preserve the façade of a historic building in Wellington’s central business district.

(BusinessDesk)

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Christchurch: New Lyttelton Cruise Ship Berth To Be Built

A new $56 million cruise ship berth will be built in Lyttelton with the plans released by the Lyttelton Port Company today. More>>

Constructions Builds: Consents Top $2 Billion For The First Time

Building consents reached a record $2 billion in March 2017, boosted by new homes and several big non-residential projects, Stats NZ said today. This was up 37 percent compared with March 2016. More>>

Other Stats:

Health: Work Underway To Address Antimicrobial Resistance

As part of a global response the Ministries of Health and Primary Industries have today jointly published ‘Antimicrobial Resistance: New Zealand’s current situation and identified areas for action’ to respond to the changing pattern of antimicrobial resistance in New Zealand. More>>

ALSO:

Employment: Vodafone Announces Family Violence Policy To Support Team

From today, any of Vodafone’s 3,000 workers affected by family violence will be eligible for a range of practical support, including up to 10 additional days of paid leave per year. More>>

Burning Up Over Saturn: Cassini's Grand Finale

With propellant running low, NASA scientists are concerned that the probe might accidentally crash into one of Saturn’s nearby moons, which could contaminate it with Earthling bacteria stuck to the spacecraft. Instead, the spacecraft will be safely "disposed" in Saturn's atmosphere. More>>

ALSO:

Our Fresh Water: Monitoring Report Confirms Serious Challenges For Rivers

• nitrogen levels are getting worse at 55 percent and getting better at 28 percent of monitored river sites across New Zealand • phosphorus levels are getting better at 42 percent and getting worse at 25 percent of monitored river sites across New Zealand More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news