Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


The simple answer to MPI milk chilling regulations

The simple answer to MPI milk chilling regulations

There are very few dairy farmers who will not be affected by the new MPI milk chilling regulations. An innovation first revealed at Central Districts Field Days promises to be the simple solution, with some added advantages. And it’s already creating a flurry of interest in the industry.

Matt Parkinson and Dale Stone are already well known in the dairy and refrigeration industries and Snapchill is their answer to the issues that the MPI’s regulations will create.

Snapchill is a milk chilling solution aimed at the 75% of New Zealand farmers who have herds if between 300 and 600 cows. The unit can typically be fitted in a day or two and does not require a power upgrade to the farm supply. It sits between farmers’ existing pre-chillers and the bulk milk vat and works by creating ice during off-peak times when power is cheaper. As it does so, it recovers heat - enough to make a tank full of water at around 82° for the plant wash.

At milking time, with just a small pump running, milk is quickly chilled to 6°C before it hits the vat. That prevents the vat temperature rising beyond the 10°C limit that the new rules demand.

One of the aspects of the cooling regulations that causes the most concern, is the impact on rural power and water supplies. Because Snapchill stores energy in the form of ice, it draws its power during off-peak times. In between milkings, water and milk temperatures need only to be maintained, which reduces the burden on water heaters and refrigeration. This is an advantage to power companies, who have already indicated that if there were to be a large increase in on-demand cooling along one power line, an upgrade of the power infrastructure may be required.

Impact on the rural water supply too is minimal. The water used to create ice resides in a sealed system, so is constantly recycled.

Since its launch just a few weeks ago, Snapchill has been exceeding sales forecasts, having sold units to customers in New Zealand and Australia. Already, significant interest is being shown from farm syndicates, farmers updating their sheds, power and insurance companies and others in the industry. They are attracted by the simplicity of the system, the lack of chemical refrigerants as well as the obvious economical and environmental advantages.

Snapchill has just moved into a new facility in Foxton in order to scale production. Dale Stone says, “Snapchill is a no brainer. We can drop one of these units on the farm and in a couple of days, that farm will comply with the new regulations. The result is reduced risk of grading and reduced risk of milk loss through failed pickups due to temperature issues.”

For more information about Snapchill, visit www.snapchill.co.nz

ENDS

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Insurance: EQC To Double Payout, Scrap Contents Insurance

New Zealand’s Earthquake Commission may double its payout amount, scrap contents insurance and process claims through private insurers under the government’s long-running review of funding and management of the state-run earthquake insurer. More>>

ALSO:

Gordon Campbell: On Tiwai Point (And Saying “No” In Greece)

Its hard to see how Rio Tinto’s one month delay in announcing its intentions about the Tiwai Point aluminium smelter is a good sign for (a) the jobs of the workers affected or (b) for the New Zealand taxpayer. More>>

ALSO:

Half Empty: Dairy Product Prices Extend Slide To Six-Year Low

Dairy product prices continued their slide, paced by whole milk power, in the latest GlobalDairyTrade auction, weakening to the lowest level in six years. More>>

ALSO:

Copper Broadband: Regulator Set To Keep Chorus Pricing Largely Unchanged

The Commerce Commission looks likely to settle on a price close to its original decision on what telecommunications network operator Chorus can charge its customers, though it probably won’t backdate any update. More>>

ALSO:

Lower Levy For Safer Cars: ACC Backtracks On Safety Assessments

Dog and Lemon: “The ACC has based the entire levy system on a set of badly flawed data from Monash University. This Monash data is riddled with errors and false assumptions; that’s the real reason for the multiple mistakes in setting ACC levies.” More>>

ALSO:

Fast Track: TPP Negotiations Set To Accelerate, Groser Says

Negotiations for the Trans-Pacific Partnership will accelerate in July, with New Zealand officials working to stitch up a deal by the month's end, according to Trade Minister Tim Groser. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news