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The simple answer to MPI milk chilling regulations

The simple answer to MPI milk chilling regulations

There are very few dairy farmers who will not be affected by the new MPI milk chilling regulations. An innovation first revealed at Central Districts Field Days promises to be the simple solution, with some added advantages. And it’s already creating a flurry of interest in the industry.

Matt Parkinson and Dale Stone are already well known in the dairy and refrigeration industries and Snapchill is their answer to the issues that the MPI’s regulations will create.

Snapchill is a milk chilling solution aimed at the 75% of New Zealand farmers who have herds if between 300 and 600 cows. The unit can typically be fitted in a day or two and does not require a power upgrade to the farm supply. It sits between farmers’ existing pre-chillers and the bulk milk vat and works by creating ice during off-peak times when power is cheaper. As it does so, it recovers heat - enough to make a tank full of water at around 82° for the plant wash.

At milking time, with just a small pump running, milk is quickly chilled to 6°C before it hits the vat. That prevents the vat temperature rising beyond the 10°C limit that the new rules demand.

One of the aspects of the cooling regulations that causes the most concern, is the impact on rural power and water supplies. Because Snapchill stores energy in the form of ice, it draws its power during off-peak times. In between milkings, water and milk temperatures need only to be maintained, which reduces the burden on water heaters and refrigeration. This is an advantage to power companies, who have already indicated that if there were to be a large increase in on-demand cooling along one power line, an upgrade of the power infrastructure may be required.

Impact on the rural water supply too is minimal. The water used to create ice resides in a sealed system, so is constantly recycled.

Since its launch just a few weeks ago, Snapchill has been exceeding sales forecasts, having sold units to customers in New Zealand and Australia. Already, significant interest is being shown from farm syndicates, farmers updating their sheds, power and insurance companies and others in the industry. They are attracted by the simplicity of the system, the lack of chemical refrigerants as well as the obvious economical and environmental advantages.

Snapchill has just moved into a new facility in Foxton in order to scale production. Dale Stone says, “Snapchill is a no brainer. We can drop one of these units on the farm and in a couple of days, that farm will comply with the new regulations. The result is reduced risk of grading and reduced risk of milk loss through failed pickups due to temperature issues.”

For more information about Snapchill, visit www.snapchill.co.nz

ENDS

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