Video | Agriculture | Confidence | Economy | Energy | Employment | Finance | Media | Property | RBNZ | Science | SOEs | Tax | Technology | Telecoms | Tourism | Transport | Search

 


IBM preferred provider for health sector IT infrastructure

IBM preferred provider for health sector IT infrastructure services


IBM has been selected as the preferred service provider for information technology (IT) infrastructure services for District Health Boards (DHBs) on a national basis, as part of an initiative to improve the security, reliability and service levels of the IT infrastructure that supports health services.

IBM, a member of the government’s Common Capability Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) panel, was chosen through an evaluation process which was overseen by Audit New Zealand. They will now work with Health Benefits Limited (HBL) and DHBs to develop a detailed business case for a National Infrastructure Platform. No decisions on a contract will be made until a business case has been consulted on.

A business case is being prepared and considers how the health sector can get better value from the estimated $30-40 million dollars a year it is currently spending on IT infrastructure. This has been developed in alignment with the National Health IT Plan which sets direction and strategy for DHBs, and is a key foundation for the work of the National Health IT Board.

“IT Infrastructure” in DHBs is primarily large hardware such as computer servers and data centres. What HBL is looking at does not involve changes to patient or laboratory records, clinical applications, or personal computer equipment such as desktops and laptops, phones, or mobile devices.


Across the 20 DHBs in New Zealand there are currently more than 40 data centres housing IT Infrastructure. They operate and are managed independently, at local and/or regional levels. No decisions have been made, but the suggested vision shared by HBL with DHBs is for a National Infrastructure Platform with agreed standards and policies and a single governing organisation, delivered out of fewer physical data centres. For those systems that require appropriate disaster recovery capability, a national approach would mean this would now be available.

Taking a national approach means DHBs leverage the scale of the sector when planning or implementing these initiatives, and potentially avoid the costs of new investment, or upgrades to existing infrastructure. It also allows the health sector to align its IT infrastructure initiatives with the Government’s overall Information Communications Technology goal of harnessing technology to deliver better, trusted public services.

The main non-financial benefits include:

improved reliability and service levels
improved security
more predictable future operating costs
a less variable environment

A National Infrastructure Platform for the health sector would be in line with an increasing trend both nationally and internationally towards standardised data centre operations. Within NZ this is evidenced in the financial services sector with each of the major banks running their operations via two data centres, as well as in the airline industry (Air NZ), government departments (Defence), local government (Auckland Council, Auckland Transport) and the utilities sector.

HBL has been working with DHBs to develop a detailed business case, including a roadmap of how changes to a national IT infrastructure approach might take place and detailed costs and benefits analysis.

This will be shared with DHBs, their staff and unions and will detail and validate a recommended option and its potential impacts. Any recommended solutions must meet the requirements of the health sector and will be delivered in a way that minimises disruption of health services.

There are just over 100 people who have part of their role working in IT infrastructure services, but very few roles are dedicated in this area – so the number of people affected by any change is expected to be small. HBL has an agreed process with the health sector, including a process for consultation with staff and unions, to be undertaken before any decisions are made.


ends

© Scoop Media

 
 
 
 
 
Business Headlines | Sci-Tech Headlines

 

Sky City : Auckland Convention Centre Cost Jumps By A Fifth

SkyCity Entertainment Group, the casino and hotel operator, is in talks with the government on how to fund the increased cost of as much as $130 million to build an international convention centre in downtown Auckland, with further gambling concessions ruled out. The Auckland-based company has increased its estimate to build the centre to between $470 million and $530 million as the construction boom across the country drives up building costs and design changes add to the bill.
More>>

ALSO:

RMTU: Mediation Between Lyttelton Port And Union Fails

The Rail and Maritime Union (RMTU) has opted to continue its overtime ban indefinitely after mediation with the Lyttelton Port of Christchurch (LPC) failed to progress collective bargaining. More>>

Earlier:

Science Policy: Callaghan, NSC Funding Knocked In Submissions

Callaghan Innovation, which was last year allocated a budget of $566 million over four years to dish out research and development grants, and the National Science Challenges attracted criticism in submissions on the government’s draft national statement of science investment, with science funding largely seen as too fragmented. More>>

ALSO:

Scoop Business: Spark, Voda And Telstra To Lay New Trans-Tasman Cable

Spark New Zealand and Vodafone, New Zealand’s two dominant telecommunications providers, in partnership with Australian provider Telstra, will spend US$70 million building a trans-Tasman submarine cable to bolster broadband traffic between the neighbouring countries and the rest of the world. More>>

ALSO:

More:

Statistics: Current Account Deficit Widens

New Zealand's annual current account deficit was $6.1 billion (2.6 percent of GDP) for the year ended September 2014. This compares with a deficit of $5.8 billion (2.5 percent of GDP) for the year ended June 2014. More>>

ALSO:

Still In The Red: NZ Govt Shunts Out Surplus To 2016

The New Zealand government has pushed out its targeted return to surplus for a year as falling dairy prices and a low inflation environment has kept a lid on its rising tax take, but is still dangling a possible tax cut in 2017, the next election year and promising to try and achieve the surplus pledge on which it campaigned for election in September. More>>

ALSO:

Job Insecurity: Time For Jobs That Count In The Meat Industry

“Meat Workers face it all”, says Graham Cooke, Meat Workers Union National Secretary. “Seasonal work, dangerous jobs, casual and zero hours contracts, and increasing pressure on workers to join non-union individual agreements. More>>

ALSO:

Get More From Scoop

 
 
Standards New Zealand

Standards New Zealand
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Business
Search Scoop  
 
 
Powered by Vodafone
NZ independent news